Category Archives: Webinar

Recording and Slides Now Available: Designing Software Platforms for Innovation and Profitability

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

From left: Martin Jouvenot, Rashesh Jethi, and Daniel Sturtevant, SDM”07

Martin Jouvenot, Software Architect, and Rashesh Jethi, Head of R&D, Amadeus
Daniel Sturtevant, PhD, CEO, Silverthread, Inc.; SDM Alumnus

Date: May 22, 2017


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Amadeus is a global technology provider to the travel industry with an engineering team of more than 6,000 software professionals and customers that include airlines, hotels, travel agencies, and other travel providers. Like any large technology company, Amadeus has to balance multiple priorities—continually adding new products and capabilities to support a large customer base while simultaneously managing complexity in systems comprised of hundreds of millions of lines of software code.

This webinar will offer suggestions on how a company can make data-driven decisions to drive focused investments that continuously improve software design and agility, enabling the business to thrive in a competitive market space. The SDM-affiliated presenters—from Amadeus and Silverthread—will describe how Amadeus business and technical strategy is both influenced by and drives choices in system architecture. The presenters will:

  • explain how a platform strategy can be used to connect business and technical decision-making;
  • describe how measuring and improving modularity across a large interconnected software system can help increase corporate agility and productivity; and
  • offer suggestions for measuring the economic performance of a software development organization in granular detail, and for using that information to deepen insight, drive quality initiatives, and steer system evolution.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speakers

Martin Jouvenot, a software architect at Amadeus North America, has 10 years’ experience working on large, distributed software applications and has initiated actions to measure and attack technical debt within his company. He holds an MS in engineering from the Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne in France and will be joining MIT as an SDM fellow this fall.

Rashesh Jethi heads up the Amadeus research and development teams for the Americas. In this role, he is responsible for the development and delivery of software platforms and products for Amadeus’ business and travel industry customers. He holds a master’s degree in industrial engineering from the University of Alabama.

Daniel Sturtevant, PhD, is an SDM alumnus and CEO of Silverthread, Inc., a firm that helps organizations improve the management of software applications and software portfolios. Silverthread’s clients include the US Department of Defense and several large enterprises, including Amadeus.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Recording and Slides Now Available: Best Practices for Water Use at Thermoelectric Facilities in Chile and Latin America

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

From left: Jorge Moreno, SDM ’11; Donny Holaschutz, SDM ’10; and Carolina Gomez

Jorge Moreno and Donny Holaschutz, Cofounders, inodú; SDM Alumni
Carolina Gomez, Sustainable Development Division, Ministry of Energy, Chile

Date: May 8, 2017


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Thermoelectric facilities are significant users of water, yet a variety of environmental, institutional, and social challenges have been triggered by withdrawing water from natural sources for this use. Some common hazards include impingement and entrainment of water organisms, the release of chemicals into the water, thermal pollution in the mixing zone, and water loss.

In this webinar, SDM alumni and inodú cofounders Jorge Moreno and Donny Holaschutz will join Carolina Gomez of Chile’s Ministry of Energy to describe best practices for water use at thermoelectric facilities and how Chile has approached its environmental, institutional, and social challenges. They will provide

  • an overview of some of the challenges caused by water use at thermoelectric facilities;
  • a summary of associated policy and regulatory initiatives in Chile; and
  • highlights from a recently published guide to best practices—the first of its kind in Latin America—that was developed by Chile’s Ministry of Energy with inodú.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speakers

SDM alumnus Donny Holaschutz is a cofounder of the energy and sustainability consultancy inodú. He is a seasoned entrepreneur with experience in both for- and not-for-profit ventures related to energy and sustainability. He holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

SDM alumnus and inodú cofounder Jorge Moreno has extensive experience in the energy industry in the United States and Latin America. He holds an MS in engineering and management from MIT and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Carolina Gomez works in the Sustainable Development Division at the Ministry of Energy in Chile, where she focuses on improving environmental impact assessments for energy and developing environmental standards for the country. She holds degrees in industrial civil engineering with a specialization in environmental engineering from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and an MSc in environmental technology from Imperial College London.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Recording and Slides Now Available: A Systems Approach to Harnessing Wind Energy

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Burak Gozluklu, PhD, SDM ’15

Burak Gozluklu, PhD, Aerospace Designer; SDM Fellow

Date: April 24, 2017


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Conventional thinking about wind energy has two components:

  • wind energy is proportional to the cube of wind speed; and
  • higher altitude increases the average wind speed.

However, if this is the case, then why does the conventional wind industry operate near 80 meters? Why don’t we go higher than that?

In this webinar, MIT SDM fellow and aerospace designer Burak Gozluklu will describe how using traditional system architecture can limit conventional wind turbine design. He will then outline the systems-based approach used by an airborne wind energy system developed by Gozluklu and his MIT team that can cost-effectively harness clean energy from high altitudes. The technology is based on work originally developed at NASA’s Langley Research Center. In 2016, Gozluklu’s team was named a winner in the NASA Startup Challenge; it is currently a finalist for the MIT Clean Energy Prize.

About the Speaker

Burak Gozluklu has nine years of experience in the aerospace industry, primarily as a lead structural design and analysis engineer. He has contributed to projects for Turkish Aerospace Industries, Tesla Motors, Boeing, and Airbus. He earned a PhD in aerospace engineering from Middle East Technical University–Ankara and is currently a fellow in the MIT System Design & Management master’s program. Gozluklu holds three patents on advanced aerostructures and drone systems. In addition, he has authored or coauthored more than 18 academic publications and received several awards. In 2016, Gozluklu and his MIT-SDM team won the Space-Race Competition organized by NASA and run by the Center for Advancing Innovation. He founded the MIT Systems Thinking Club and is currently working in Professor John Sterman’s System Dynamics group at MIT Sloan School of Management.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Recording and Slides Now Available: Can a Life-Cycle Assessment Model Aid Sustainability Negotiations?

MIT Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Ellen Czaika, PhD, Head of Global Engagement, Gamaya; SDM Alumna

Ellen Czaika, SDM ’08

Date: April 10, 2017


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Supply chain partners often work together to negotiate a more environmentally friendly end of life for their product. However, while they can typically agree on issues such as sustainability, environmental protection, financial feasibility, and social impact, partners are frequently unable to reconcile disparate business strategies. This can result in serious disagreements about how to reach common goals.

In this webinar, SDM alumna Dr. Ellen Czaika, head of global engagement at Gamaya, will discuss her research into whether a life-cycle assessment model can help. She will:

  • explain what a life-cycle assessment model is, why such a model can improve negotiations, and how she tested the model’s benefits in her research;
  • compare the benefits of using an expert-created model versus one created by the parties involved;
  • detail ways to use the model to test alternatives; and
  • provide recommendations for other sustainability negotiations.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Dr. Ellen Czaika is head of global engagement for Gamaya, a spinoff of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne that uses machine learning on hyperspectral imagery to help farmers increase their crop yields to feed the growing global population. Czaika holds a PhD from MIT and two master’s degrees: one in in applied statistics from the University of Oxford and one in engineering and management received as a graduate of MIT System Design & Management (SDM). Her doctoral research builds on her SDM master’s thesis and investigates how quantitative models can be used in sustainability negotiations and decisions. She currently applies this interest in data-driven decision-making to the precision agriculture domain.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

Recording and Slides Now Available): Adventures in Strategy, Systems Thinking, and Business Frameworks in the Real Corporate World

MIT Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Aravind Ratnam, Head of Connected Vehicle Products, Wind River; SDM Alumnus

ratnam

Aravind Ratnam, SDM ’10

Date: April 19, 2017
Time: Noon – 1 p.m. ET

Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Strategic thinking is both an art and a science; it’s a perspective that one must develop to see the forest for the trees in today’s dynamic business environment. The Internet of Things, driverless cars, analytics, and other innovations require winning business models­ that are just as complex as products. Successful leaders must be able to zoom out to see the big picture and zoom in to see the details. They must keep one eye on the present while looking ahead. Strategic, systems-based thinking is essential.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Aravind Ratnam, head of connected vehicle products at Wind River, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation, will share his adventures and lessons learned in using this approach to innovate and lead.

He will:

  • discuss how strategy is practiced in management consulting and in industry;
  • offer examples of how strategists think through real-life challenges;
  • suggest tools, tips, and tricks for building a strategic thinking mindset;
  • provide an overview of careers in strategy with insight into both the hype and the reality.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Aravind Ratnam is head of connected vehicle products at Wind River, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation. As a thought leader within the industrial Internet of Things and connected devices market, he drives internal strategic alignment, innovation planning, business unit strategy, corporate positioning, and internal business optimization (including financial alignment) while providing advice to Intel’s executive staff and business leaders. Previously he worked as a strategy consultant at IBB and Monitor Deloitte, and he has experience in product marketing, systems engineering, and physics research. As an SDM alumnus, he holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT. He also has degrees in space science and instrumentation engineering.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

Applying Systems-Based Methods to Challenges in Product Development, Management, and Organizational Dynamics

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Ron Pepin, Former CIO, Otis Elevator Company Americas Region; SDM Alumnus

Ron Pepin, SDM ’97

Date: March 27, 2017


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

As an alumnus of the first graduating class of MIT System Design & Management (SDM) in 1999, Ron Pepin, former CIO of Otis Elevator Company’s Americas Region, has used systems-based methodologies to address the technical, business, and social components of complex challenges for nearly 20 years. In this webinar, Pepin will discuss the SDM tools he uses most frequently and the impact systems thinking has had on the teams he has led and on Otis Elevator as a whole.

Pepin will:

  • provide an overview of several MIT SDM principles, methodologies, and tools;
  • discuss how they complemented what he leaned as an undergraduate in electrical engineering and as an MBA grad; and
  • outline examples of how he used his SDM education to successfully deliver technology projects (especially through project and program management), personal and organizational motivation, and software development life-cycle models.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Ron Pepin, former CIO of Otis Elevator Company’s Americas Region, has more than 30 years of experience, with deep expertise in program management and group motivation. He has led technology teams that delivered measurable results in sales, field service, supply chain, and finance organizations. Pepin holds a BS in electrical engineering from Western New England College, an MBA from the University of Hartford, and, as an SDM alumnus, an SM in engineering and management from MIT. He is currently an information technology consultant.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

A Systems Approach to Creating Affordable Access to Medical Devices in Africa

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Oluwasoga Oni, CEO and Founder, MDaaS; SDM Alumnus

Oluwasoga Oni, SDM ’14

Date: March 13, 2017
Time: Noon – 1 p.m. ET


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Medical devices have the power to transform the healthcare landscape and dramatically improve health outcomes around the globe. However, access to life-saving medical equipment and supplies is far from universal. In Africa, there are not enough medical devices to serve the vast population of more than 1 billion—and, according to the World Health Organization, 40 percent of the medical devices available are currently out of service. In many parts of the continent, this dearth of functioning medical equipment means that diseases are diagnosed too late or not at all.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Oluwasoga Oni will explain how he used systems thinking to develop a startup designed to improve affordable access to medical devices in his home country, Nigeria, and ultimately across Africa.

Webinar attendees will learn about:

  • the Nigerian and African healthcare ecosystem;
  • using systems analysis to identify the challenges in this ecosystem and their drivers;
  • the pros and cons of existing approaches to solving medical device challenges; and
  • using the Idealized Design Framework to create a new model for tackling Africa’s medical equipment problem.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Oluwasoga Oni is the CEO and founder of MDaaS, a medical equipment services company dedicated to improving affordable access to high-quality medical devices in Nigeria and across Africa. Previously, Oni worked as a software engineer for a large multinational data storage organization. He holds a bachelor’s degree in information and communication technology from Covenant University in Ogun, Nigeria, and a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. As a graduate of the System Design & Management program, he also holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

A Smart City Pilot in Boston: Collecting Human-Centric Urban Data

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Nissia Sabri, CEO and Cofounder, Bitsence; SDM Alumna

Sabri, Nissia

Nissia Sabri, SDM ’14

Date: February 27, 2017

Download the presentation slides (pdf)

About the Presentation

In this webinar, SDM alumna Nissia Sabri, CEO and cofounder of Bitsence, will provide an overview of the unique potential of agile sensor technologies for city planning. She will also show how they can be connected and correlated to produce novel and rich new insights about the constellation of city spaces and stakeholders.

Sabri will begin by discussing roadblocks that have emerged to date in this arena, such as:

  • increased fragmentation of sensor technologies in the field;
  • technological tunnel vision and lack of system integration by end users; and
  • challenges in educating stakeholders, such as city planning offices, community advocacy groups, and individual citizens about the multifaceted need for sensors, as well as their value.

Sabri will also describe why a systems-based approach should be employed. She will illustrate with examples from:

  • Chicago’s Array of Things, which tested a variety of sensors working together in a single location; and
  • Boston’s Local Sense Lab, a public/private entities coalition chartered to guide city officials in evaluating, deploying, and analyzing data from networked sensors in order to design better urban infrastructure and improve community engagement.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

An alumna of MIT System Design & Management, Nissia Sabri is CEO and cofounder of Bitsence, which monitors human movement and behavior in physical space and also uses data and insights to improve cities, architecture, and real estate developments. She has seven years of experience in the energy sector, including working as a risk analyst creating data models to forecast the failure of complex systems. She holds three advanced degrees: an MS in engineering and management from MIT; an MS in nuclear and radiological engineering from the University of Florida; and an MS in physics from the Grenoble Institute of Technology in France. She is the recipient of the 2015 MIT SDM Student Award for Leadership, Innovation, and Systems Thinking.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed at sdm.mit.edu.

Redesigning/Updating the Healthcare Information Infrastructure: A Systems-Based Approach

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

hartzbandDavid Hartzband, DSc, Research Affiliate, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, MIT; Founder and Principal, Post Technical Research

Date: November 28, 2016


Download the presentation slides (pdf)

About the Presentation

Primary Care Associations (PCAs) are the federally chartered, one-per-state organizations responsible for providing guidance and services to federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This webinar will focus on the PCA in Texas, the Texas Association of Community Health Centers (TACHC), which serves 72 of the state’s 94 FQHCs, supporting approximately 2 million patients a year. The TACHC provides:

  • information technology (IT) consulting, deployment, and management of a statewide high-speed healthcare network;
  • development and maintenance services for a Health Center Controlled Network (HCCN) that supplies a data warehouse for clinical and demographic data across all centers;
  • analysis and interpretation of clinical and demographic data for clinical and operational improvement; and
  • an accountable-care organization for a group of health centers.

Non-IT related services are also provided.

In this webinar, Dr. David Hartzband will:

  • describe how he evaluated the technical infrastructure, organizational structure and processes, and cultural environment of the entity providing these services;
  • outline his findings, which included discovering highly conventional structures and technical components that were approximately three to five years out of date;
  • share a plan developed to update the health IT infrastructure and associated organizational structures; and
  • describe how this plan was received by the executive director and staff of the TACHC.

He will also outline the plan’s implementation and current status while sharing the challenges involved in working with organizational structures, processes, and culture.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

David Hartzband, DSc, is a research affiliate at MIT’s Institute for Data, Systems, and Society. He is also the founder and principal of Post Technical Research, a technology consulting firm specializing in healthcare information technology and machine intelligence.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed at sdm.mit.edu.

 

Logistics That Learn: A Dynamic Engine to Drive a Smarter Logistics Future

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

kamil

Ali Kamil

Ali Kamil, Cofounder and Head of Product and Technology, Wise Systems; MIT SDM Fellow

Date: November 14, 2016

Download the presentation slides (pdf)

About the Presentation

Logistics is in a state of transition, and no link in the supply chain is more in flux than the last mile (when goods reach stores or customers). The impatient demands of consumers and the pressure of the modern sharing economy (as emblemized by Uber and Airbnb) require companies to be more agile than ever. To compete at this new level, companies are increasingly making decisions in real time—adjusting to changes as they happen, while looking for ways to predict changes in advance.

Now, companies are using machine learning models to try to stay ahead of consumer demand without sacrificing efficiency. In this webinar, MIT SDM fellow Ali Kamil, cofounder and head of product and technology at Wise Systems, will discuss:

  • traditional logistics methods and why they are becoming obsolete;
  • dynamic decision-making models driven by operations research and machine learning;
  • examples of companies that are taking advantage of intelligent software; and
  • the exciting future of last-mile delivery (e.g., autonomous vehicles and connected everything).

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Ali Kamil is a cofounder of Wise Systems, where he serves as head of product and technology. His expertise is in employing big data, social computing, and system dynamics–based models to identify patterns of human behavior, connectivity, and urban mobility. He holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science and economics from the Georgia Institute of Technology and, as an MIT SDM fellow, will receive a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

How to Avoid Overengineering

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Christine Miyachi, Software Systems Engineer and Architect, Xerox Corporation; SDM Alumna

miyachi

Christine Miyachi, SDM ’00

Date: October 31, 2016


Download the presentation slides (pdf)

About the Presentation

Why do overly complicated systems occur more frequently than simple ones?

In this webinar, MIT SDM alumna Christine Miyachi, software systems engineer and architect at Xerox Corporation, will discuss how to recognize the signs of overengineering and how to prevent it. She will

  • define overengineering and discuss why it occurs;
  • provide examples of simple and overengineered systems;
  • share lessons learned about what worked well and what could have been improved in these systems; and
  • discuss the roles of courage, prediction, and serendipity in creating beautiful, simple systems that can stand the test of time.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Christine Miyachi is a software systems engineer and architect at Xerox Corporation with almost 30 years of experience working for startup and large companies. She holds several patents and writes a blog about software architecture. She holds a BS in electrical engineering from the University of Rochester and two master’s degrees from MIT: an SM in technology and policy/electrical engineering and computer science and, as an SDM alumna, an SM in engineering and management. She is currently the chair of the IEEE Cloud Computing Steering Committee.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Agile Project Dynamics for Aerospace and Defense Technologies and Plus Lessons for Other Sectors

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Firas Glaiel, Corporate Technology Area Director, Information Systems and Computing, Raytheon; SDM Alumnus

GLAIEL, FIRAS

Firas Glaiel, SDM ’10

Date: October 17, 2016

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Commercial software providers have adopted “agile” believing that it will help lower costs, shorten development times, and deliver greater customer satisfaction. Now government contractors are looking at agile methods to help them compete successfully in the aerospace and defense domains. For them, two questions are paramount: Can agile succeed in the large-scale government systems development domain? And if so, how?

This presentation by SDM alumnus Firas Glaiel, Raytheon’s corporate technology area director for information systems and computing, is designed for government contractors as well as professionals in a wide variety of other domains. Glaiel will:

  • provide a brief overview of systems thinking;
  • describe system dynamics—a method for modeling and understanding the dynamic behavior of complex systems; and
  • define agile practices and outline a framework for better understanding them.

He will then share research results, including:

  • the seven agile techniques (seven genes) used by successful project teams, aka the “genome of the agile”; and
  • a description of the system dynamics model developed from this research—agile project dynamics—including the structure and time-delayed relationships for capturing the impact of agile genes on emergent system behaviors.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Firas Glaiel is Raytheon’s corporate technology area director for information systems and computing. He is responsible for coordinating technology and research, including cross-business alignment, collaboration with universities and external organizations, and support for technology strategy development. He also works on strategic research and development projects in big data analytics, cybersecurity, high-performance computing, and agile systems development. He holds a BS in computer engineering from Lebanese American University, a BS in computer system engineering from Boston University, and as an alumnus of MIT System Design & Management, an MS in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

Building an AI Product to Improve High-Tech Sales

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Bryan Pirtle, Cofounder and Chief Technology Officer, Nova.ai; SDM Fellow

Pirtle, Bryan1_pp

Bryan Pirtle, SDM ’13

Date: September 12, 2016

Download Presentation File

About the Presentation

Today, almost every industry is being disrupted by the emergence of “intelligent software.” While software was once used simply to improve efficiency and workflow, now more and more businesses are demanding that software help them make smarter, more data-driven decisions. Perhaps surprisingly, this is even true in sales—especially in the high-technology sector. Modern technology sales teams demand software that offers a competitive edge in an increasingly complex and globalized world.

In this webinar, SDM fellow Bryan Pirtle, chief technology officer of Nova.ai, a sales technology startup, will:

  • provide an overview of the current technology sales ecosystem;
  • explain how his team successfully built an artificial intelligence (AI) product for the contemporary technology sales organization; and
  • explore how the trend toward smarter software and AI products is changing the way people buy and sell.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Bryan Pirtle started his career as a consultant building dynamic e-commerce websites and consumer electronics, then he worked in the wine industry on big data and real-time control systems. He is now a co-founder and the chief technology officer of a sales technology startup, Nova.ai. Nova is a Y Combinator alumnus of the winter 2016 class and has just been accepted into the Salesforce.com incubator to accelerate its growth over the course of the six-month program. At Nova, Pirtle spends most of his time building technology and talking to customers about how to make their salespeople more efficient and data-driven. Pirtle is currently an SDM fellow.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Applying Joy’s Law to Open Innovation at NASA

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Jernigan

Mark Jernigan, SDM ’00

Mark Jernigan, Assistant Director, Human Health and Performance Directorate, Exploration Systems Development Support, NASA; SDM Alumnus

Date: June 6, 2016

Download presentation slides

About the Presentation

In an era of increasingly bold objectives and correspondingly tight budgets, NASA is going beyond traditional mechanisms to solve problems related to space exploration. Open innovation is key. One method that NASA’s Human Health and Performance Directorate uses is Joy’s Law. Credited to Sun Microsystems cofounder Bill Joy, the law states that “no matter who you are, the smartest people always work for someone else.”

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Mark Jernigan, assistant director of NASA’s Human Health and Performance Directorate in the area of Exploration Systems Development Support, will:

  • explain why relying solely on your organization’s employees can limit problem-solving and innovation—and never solve all of your customers’ needs;
  • expand on Joy’s Law by discussing why it is better to create an ecology that encourages the world’s smartest people who don’t work for you to help you solve your problems—and how to do that;
  • discuss mechanisms that NASA uses to incentivize outsiders to propose and develop solutions with unexpected and exciting results incurred at significantly lower investment;
  • describe how his organization encourages team members to think and work “out of the box”;
  • review several open innovation techniques; and
  • offer information about a data-driven tool used to help overcome cultural biases impeding adoption of these techniques.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Mark Jernigan has more than 35 years of experience at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where he develops and delivers hardware and software projects and advanced capabilities for human spaceflight. He recently completed a rotation as executive director of the Rice Space Institute and returned to NASA as associate director in the Johnson Space Center’s Human Health and Performance Directorate. There he manages the effort to ensure that next-generation human exploration systems and advanced technologies have the necessary capabilities to sustain the mission’s crew, meet human performance constraints, and maximize both mission safety and success. He holds a BS in aero engineering from Texas A&M University and, as an SDM alumnus, an MS in engineering and management from MIT.

 

Is the Commissioned Sales Force Model Right for Today’s Semiconductor Industry?

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Marvin, Heath

Heath Marvin, SDM ’14

Heath Marvin, Field Applications Engineer, Microchip Technology; SDM Fellow

Date: May 23, 2016

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About the Presentation

The semiconductor industry has entered a new phase where growth has slowed to a pace more in line with the rest of the economy. This shift requires that business be conducted across the industry in new ways that will help to sustain and grow profitability. One area in critical need of reform is the way in which companies incentivize and compensate their sales forces. While the norm now is to pay commissions based on completed sales, current research indicates that there are benefits to using a sales process that does not include commissions.

In this webinar, SDM Fellow Heath Marvin will discuss how system dynamics can be used to test and compare the robustness of a commission-less model against the more traditional system. He will:

  • explain modeling and simulation techniques that can analyze the effects of using different types of incentive plans;
  • review results that reveal that a commission-less sales force is superior in nearly every scenario; and
  • demonstrate why a sales force can be more effective without commissions when selling a complex product in a complex industry—whether the economy is growing, stable, or in a recession.
A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Heath Marvin started his career as a semiconductor chip designer and has been moving closer to the customer ever since. He now works as a field applications engineer for Microchip Technology and spends most of his time working with customers designing embedded products, including a wide variety of microcontrollers. In June 2016, he will receive a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT as a System Design & Management graduate.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Competing at Innovative Speed: Why Is It So Darn Hard?

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

SteveSpearColorPhoto

Steven J. Spear, DBA

Steven J. Spear, DBA, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management and School of Engineering; Author: The High Velocity Edge

Date: May 9, 2016

Slides available here

About the Presentation

Today’s companies can no longer lock in market share with barriers that keep competitors at bay and customers and employees from defecting. As a result, competitive paradigms have irrevocably transformed from finding and sustaining a position to practicing relentless innovation.

In this webinar, Dr. Steven J. Spear will define “relentless innovation” and how to use it to continually identify new targets and be the first to achieve them. He will discuss:

  • why management decisions can no longer be made primarily by using sophisticated models to gather and analyze data;
  • why today’s companies must also employ experiential and experimental approaches while constantly testing new ideas about what to do and how to do it; and
  • how to achieve this new level of competitiveness at innovative speed—and why that is easier said than done.

Attendees will learn:

  • ways to assess their organization’s willingness and ability to practice hyper-experimentation;
  • how to encourage the continual generation of fresh ideas;
  • why and how to discern if customers, suppliers, and vendors are competing at innovative speed;
  • tips for practicing “energy activation,” including how to cultivate the freedom to discover and understand what’s going right or wrong; and
  • how to identify recurring challenges, such as socio-psychological impediments, and address and mitigate them.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Dr. Steven J. Spear, a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and School of Engineering, is a well-recognized expert on innovation. He has worked for the investment bank Prudential-Bache and the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment, among others, and taught at Harvard Business School. His consulting clients include Lockheed Martin, John Deere, and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Spear is also an award-winning author. His book, The High Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition (McGraw Hill, 2010), has won several awards, including the Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing Research and the Philip Crosby Medal from the American Society for Quality. He holds a BS in economics from Princeton University, an MA in management and an MS in mechanical engineering from MIT, and a PhD from Harvard Business School.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Cultivating Resilience with Heuristics and Systems Thinking: Lessons from New Industries

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Burl Amsbury, Business Consultant, Entrepreneur, Inventor, and Cattleman; SDM Alumnus

Date: April 25, 2016

Slides available here

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Burl Amsbury, SDM ’99

About the Presentation

Regenerative ranching, sustainable agriculture, organic foods, integrative medicine, and other new or niche markets have much to teach companies of any age, in any industry. Two key elements many use to compete effectively are heuristics and systems thinking.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Burl Amsbury will offer lessons in how to design or redesign your organization by sharing specific systems thinking heuristics drawn from his experience as an entrepreneur, startup executive, big company employee, US Navy pilot, engineer, and creative problem-solver. Using examples from new and/or niche industries, Amsbury will discuss:

  • common themes among industries that employ systems thinking principles—even if they don’t use that term;
  • why systems thinking is rapidly being put to work in so many disparate fields; and
  • heuristic principles for designing an entrepreneurial organization within a fast-growth niche in any industry.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Burl Amsbury graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1988 with a combined SB and SM in electrical engineering and, as an SDM alum, earned an SM in engineering and management from MIT in 2000. Between stints at MIT, he flew A-6E Intruders for the US Navy aboard the USS Kitty Hawk and helped develop what became the Segway self-balancing scooter. Amsbury has been an executive in four startup and high-growth technology-enabled companies located in Colorado’s Front Range region. He has been named the primary inventor on three patents and is a contributing inventor on 26 others, including Kiva System’s warehouse robot. A cattleman, Amsbury is a business coach and consultant for sustainable agriculture endeavors, natural/organic food enterprises, and functional medicine practitioners.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Using Systems Thinking to Assess and Address Cybersecurity Challenges

By Charles Iheagwara, PhD, SDM ’10

The challenge: Cybersecurity is a growing industry, with a market expected to expand to about $120.1 billion by 2017. The proliferation of product offerings provides companies with a wide range of security options but makes it increasingly difficult to assess which product best suits specific intrusion prevention needs.

Users therefore need a method for:

  • Acquiring insight into the inherent characteristics and modes of operation for a wide variety of cybersecurity products;
  • Eliminating the pain points associated with choosing the wrong products;
  • Preventing the disastrous consequences of failing to detect and prevent intrusions; and ultimately
  • Meeting the intrusion prevention goals unique to their specific enterprises.

The approach: An SaaS application/tool has been developed to allow users of intrusion prevention products to customize a business case analysis for any deployment and target environment or market. The patent-pending tool (IntrusionPoint™) accepts a wide range of market data, technical parameters, and business/financial and service planning inputs that users can tailor to their own deployment plans. It simulates a network deployment and operations using a variety of technical, environmental, and service plans and produces a detailed analytical report, analytics output graphs, and key technical, deployment and implementation metrics.

The tools: The systems thinking mindset central to MIT’s System Design & Management (SDM) program, as well as several systems engineering tools commonly taught in SDM were employed to develop the application. The process included:

  • defining and designing a systems architecture to encapsulate the different modular system subcomponents;
  • conducting a systems dynamics analysis of the various factors that could affect the system in either a positive or negative direction;
  • developing an information flow schema;
  • developing an algorithm that performs mathematical computation using the system input data to produce a set of desirable system output in the form of decision-making intelligence reports, analytics, and visual charts;
  • developing the system analytics and visualization subsystems; and
  • developing a web portal.

The results: The IntrusionPoint application performs artificial intelligence decision-making analysis of enterprise intrusion prevention solutions, providing a computer-implemented method for evaluating the suitability of cybersecurity products for any particular user.

The method accomplishes the following tasks:

  • obtaining weights representing the relative importance of a plurality of attributes related to intrusion protection systems;
  • obtaining a plurality of attribute scores for each of the plurality of attributes related to intrusion protection systems; and
  • calculating a weighted sum of the plurality of attribute scores based on the weights.

The tool’s logical design construct and implementation provides a variety of analytics and visualizations from which end users, product developers, and vendors can gain insight into the pros and cons of each solution and thus make informed decisions related to purchases, product enhancements, and other cybersecurity tasks.

Intrusionpoint Compare 3

These charts represent a sampling of the analytics generated by the IntrusionPoint tool that enable customers to visualize the technical performance of various cybersecurity products.

Intrusionpoint Compare 4

About the Author

Charles.Iheagwara

Charles Iheagwara, PhD, SDM ’10

Charles Iheagwara, PhD, is a customer solutions advocate and security solutions consultant at Cisco, Inc. Previously, he served as managing director at Unatek Inc. and as a consultant in various capacities at Grant Thornton, KPMG, Lockheed Martin, and Edgar Online. He holds a PhD from the University of Glamorgan in the United Kingdom and, as an SDM alumnus, an MS in engineering and management from MIT. He also earned an MS in mineral engineering from the University of Minnesota and a BS and MS in metallurgical engineering from Russia’s Moscow Institute for Steel and Alloys. Dr. Iheagwara has published widely and is a frequent speaker at industry events.

 

How to Navigate the Perils and Promises of Intrusion Prevention Systems

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Charles.Iheagwara

Charles Iheagwara, PhD, SDM ’10

Charles Iheagwara, PhD, Customer Solutions Advocate and Security Solutions Consultant, Cisco Systems, Inc.; SDM Alumnus

Date: March 21, 2016


Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Although the market is full of intrusion prevention products, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to every business need. In this webinar, SDM alumnus Dr. Charles Iheagwara will offer suggestions for how to cut through the jargon and evaluate which products will best meet your organization’s requirements.

He will discuss:

  • a working definition of intrusion prevention;
  • critical criteria for evaluating products that include—and go beyond—meeting budgetary and implementation needs;
  • how employing these criteria can enhance your cybersecurity strategy while addressing your organization’s technical, business, and socio-political challenges.

In short, there are ramifications to choosing one security solution over another. This session will suggest an approach to preventing the types of security failures that can reverberate throughout and beyond your organization.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Dr. Charles Iheagwara is a customer solutions advocate and security solutions consultant at Cisco, Inc. Previously, he served as managing director at Unatek, Inc., and as a consultant in various capacities at Grant Thornton, KPMG, Lockheed Martin, and Edgar Online. He holds a PhD from the University of Glamorgan in the United Kingdom and, as an SDM alumnus, an MS in engineering and management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He also earned an MS in mineral engineering from the University of Minnesota and a BS and MS in metallurgical engineering from Russia’s Moscow Institute for Steel and Alloys. Dr. Iheagwara has published widely and is a frequent speaker at industry events.

About the Series

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

A Systems-Based Approach to Startups: Why They Fail and How They Can Succeed

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

MIT student portraits, System Management and Design

Fady Saad, SDM ’11

Fady Saad, Strategy, Research, and Business Development Director, Vecna Technologies; SDM Alumnus

Date: March 7, 2016

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Any evaluation of the life cycle of established companies will reveal the importance of taking a holistic approach to fundamental business challenges such as product development, customer acquisition, financial growth, and employee and leadership recruitment. Making progress on all fronts simultaneously is critical for companies at all stages of development, but it is especially important for startups.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Fady Saad, director of strategy, research, and business development at Vecna Technologies, will:

  • explain why mature companies can afford delays in responding to a broad set of internal and external issues while startups cannot;
  • reveal how early business and policy decisions can help and/or hurt a startup during subsequent phases of its life cycle; and
  • explore how an understanding of these business dynamics can impact the formation and growth of companies in both the short and long term.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Fady Saad is the strategy, research and business development director at Vecna Robotic Solutions, as well as the co-founder and Director of Partnerships of MassRobotics, and was previously cofounder and strategist of ePowerhouse. Prior to coming to MIT, he worked at Nokia Systems Networks in North Africa and Europe and consulted for the World Bank. As an SDM alumnus, Saad holds an MS in engineering and management from MIT. He also earned a BS in mechanical engineering from the American University in Cairo.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings from prior MIT SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Architecting and Building Private Clouds by Leveraging Systems Thinking

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Deep Bhattacharjee, SDM ’07

Ratnadeep (Deep) Bhattacharjee, Head of Product Management, ZeroStack; and SDM alumnus

Date: February 22, 2016

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Cost, performance, and regulatory restrictions frequently prevent companies from moving to a public cloud. Many want to build their own clouds; however, the norms for designing and operating public clouds cannot always be applied to private ones. Consequently, the challenge of creating a successful private cloud can be daunting.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Ratnadeep Bhattacharjee, head of product management at ZeroStack, will describe how systems thinking can be used to design an alternative architecture that can deliver an optimal private cloud experience. He will discuss:

  • the evolution of software systems in general;
  • the sea change that public cloud services like Amazon Web Services has brought about regarding how enterprises design, manage, and deliver IT services to users; and
  • how understanding the above can help IT professionals avoid pitfalls in building a private cloud.

Attendees will learn about:

  • attributes of a general cloud-based system and how to measure its business value;
  • specific factors involved in developing and deploying a private cloud;
  • how to evaluate private cloud technology as an IT management system; and
  • the benefits a private cloud can offer, such as reduced maintenance, improved performance, and more.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

Register

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Deep Bhattacharjee is the head of product management at ZeroStack. He previously worked at VMware as the group product manager responsible for re-architecting the company’s core management platform. He also served as head of cloud product management at Canonical and, earlier in his career, in various roles during 10 years at Sun Microsystems. He holds an MS in engineering and management from MIT and an MS in computer science from Pennsylvania State University.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

The Importance of (Big) Data for Healthcare Safety-Net Organizations

hartzband

David Hartzband, DSc

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

David Hartzband, DSc, Research Affiliate, MIT Sociotechnical Systems Research Center

Date: February 8, 2016


Slides available here.

About the Presentation

Big data holds great promise for understanding the successes and failures of systems in a wide range of industries. This webinar will explore the use of big data in the healthcare system, with specific reference to a multiyear project that deployed Hadoop-based analytics at 33 Federally Qualified Community Health Centers with approximately 1.3 million patients.

The project analyzed five years of data to assess data quality and its impact on care and found that:

  • reporting of specific conditions was often lower than expected given known estimates for the US population;
  • the rates of obesity and heart disease as reported appeared especially low; and
  • these apparent data errors made identifying comorbidities problematic.

The speaker will explore possible system causes for these results, including:

  • a structural misalignment of electronic health records with actual health center practices;
  • impediments to proper reporting caused by sociocultural and organizational contexts; and
  • poor-quality data.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

David Hartzband, DSc, is a research affiliate of the MIT Sociotechnical Systems Research Center where he does research on technology evolution and adoption for healthcare organizations. He is the founder of PostTechnical Research, a technology futures and consulting firm that works primarily with early stage healthcare information companies on issues of technology evolution, product development, and technology landscape. He is also director for technology research at the RCHN Community Health Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on issues of healthcare policy and technology for Federally Qualified Community Health Centers nationwide. He holds a doctoral degree in mathematics.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This WebEx service includes a feature that allows audio and any documents and other materials exchanged or viewed during the session to be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to the recording, discuss your concerns with the meeting host prior to the start of the recording or do not join the session. Please note that any such recordings may be subject to discovery in the event of litigation.

 

A Systems Analysis of Tactical Intelligence in the US Army

Wisniewski

Jillian Wisniewski, SDM ’14

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Jillian Wisniewski, Captain, US Army; System Dynamics Instructor, US Military Academy at West Point; SDM Alumna

Date: November 16, 2015

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Modern intelligence analysts must generate and direct intelligence that supports the pace of tactical operations for a modular force with decentralized decision-making. Digital collection platforms, information systems, analytical software, and connectivity at the tactical level are useful but insufficient. Analysts need training in data analysis fundamentals to understand how to leverage these systems to support tactical mission planning and decision-making.

This type of analysis uses systems design tools to:

  • examine and model the design of military operations;
  • define the analyst’s required capability in the context of tactical operations;
  • explore, revise, and assess components of intelligence competency;
  • assess the relative costs of competency gaps; and
  • recommend improvements.

Webinar attendees will gain an understanding of how structural changes impact organizational processes as well as how performance shortfalls and shortcut methodologies impair military operations. They will also learn:

  • how to apply design thinking and systems methodologies to improve the training and educational requirements within an organization; and
  • how to apply system dynamics to explore the drivers of mission performance outcomes.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Jillian Wisniewski is an Army captain and system dynamics instructor at the US Military Academy at West Point (USMA). She holds a BS in operations research from USMA and, as an SDM alumna, she holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

Understanding and Measuring the Impact of Enterprise Social Software on Business Practices

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Suzanne Livingston, Product Manager, IBM; SDM Alumna

Date: November 2, 2015

livingston

Suzanne Livingston, SDM ’13

About the Presentation

Organizations are increasingly investing in enterprise social software, which provides collaboration tools such as communities and people profiles, to support their business goals. For many, however, the practical impact of such technologies is unclear. Companies struggle with insufficient usage to demonstrate meaningful impact and have difficulty comparing performance with social technology to performance without.

This webinar will provide research-based guidelines that can help companies understand:

  • whether a technology investment has been worthwhile;
  • which areas of the company have gained value from it; and
  • which areas of the company have seen no improvement.

Attendees will learn:

  • how to address user adoption issues to improve impact; and
  • how to identify business metrics they can use to compare performance before and after adopting social technology.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Suzanne Livingston is a product manager at IBM, where she manages a team of product and offerings managers in IBM’s Enterprise Social Solutions division, which encompasses mail, chat, meetings, audio/video, cognitive computing, social technologies, and more. In this role, she helped launch IBM Connections, a social software suite for businesses and organizations. Livingston is also a teaching fellow at Harvard Business School. As an SDM alumna, she holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

How to Build a Culture of Innovation Through Design and Systems Thinking

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Andrea Ippolito, Presidential Innovation Fellow, US Department of Veterans Affairs; SDM Alumna

Date: October 19, 2015

About the Presentation

In this webinar, SDM alumna Andrea Ippolito, a presidential innovation fellow, will describe how the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) developed and implemented an innovators network. She will cover:

  • the human-centered design and systems methodologies used to develop the VA Innovators Network;
  • the strategy used to build a culture of innovation designed to help employees develop the best possible services and experiences for veterans and their supporters;
  • the VA Innovation Creation Series, an open innovation system designed to accelerate the development of personalized prosthetics and assistive technologies for veterans with disabilities; and
  • the development and deployment of an open innovation strategy–plus program at the VA using open challenge platforms such as InnoCentive and GrabCAD.

Webinar attendees will learn:

  • how to apply design thinking and systems methodologies to improve the innovation culture within organizations;
  • what open innovation tools organizations can use to harness the power of the crowd and improve innovation output; and
  • ways to build an innovation network at your organization, no matter what your industry.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Andrea Ippolito is a presidential innovation fellow based at the US Department of Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation. A PhD student in engineering systems at MIT, she cofounded Smart Scheduling, a software firm specializing in medical appointment planning. She has also served as an innovation specialist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Innovation Hub, as co-leader of MIT’s Hacking Medicine, as product innovation manager at athenahealth, and as a research scientist within the corporate technology development group at Boston Scientific. As an SDM alumna, she holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT. She also has a BS and a master’s degree, both in biomedical engineering, from Cornell University.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed here.

 

The Technology-Based Transformation of the Media Industry

IWB_Headshot

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, PhD

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, PhD, Visiting Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

Date: September 21, 2015

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Just about every industry has been transformed by the relentless advances of digital technologies that have taken place over the past 20 years. But, like few others, the media industry continues to be severely disrupted by the digital revolution. Everything seems to be changing at once, from the way content is produced, delivered, and consumed, to the sources of revenue and profits. Globalization, deregulation, technological innovation, and the convergence of previously separate industries such as entertainment, communications, and consumer electronics has led to a highly turbulent media landscape.

This talk will explore some of the huge changes taking place in the media industry, with particular emphasis on the major negative, as well as positive, impacts of these changes. The presentation will examine the similarly transformative changes that are taking place in other industries and will map out the innovations and cultural changes required to help companies not only survive but thrive amid such major technology-based transformations.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger retired from IBM in May 2007 after a 37-year career with the company, where his primary focus was on innovation and technical strategy. He led a number of IBM’s companywide initiatives, including the Internet, e-business, supercomputing, and Linux. From March 2008 to June 2014 he was a strategic advisor at Citigroup, working on innovation and technology initiatives such as the transition to mobile digital money.

Since 2005, Wladawsky-Berger has been writing a weekly blog, irvingwb.com, which has also been published in The Wall Street Journal’s “CIO Journal” since April 2012.

He is a strategic advisor on innovation at HBO and at MasterCard, visiting lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, adjunct professor at the Imperial College Business School, and executive-in-residence at New York University’s Center for Urban Science and Progress. He is a member of the board of directors of Inno360 and the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, and he serves on the advisory board of the University of Southern California’s Annenberg Innovation Lab.

Wladawsky-Berger received an MS and a PhD in physics from the University of Chicago.

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

 

 

How to Prepare for Workforce Continuity and Business Operations in the Upcoming Flu Season: It’s Nothing to Sneeze At!

Larson

Richard C. Larson, PhD

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Richard C. Larson, PhD, Mitsui Professor of Engineering Systems, MIT; Founding Director, MIT Center for Engineering System Fundamentals

Date: Thursday, September 10, 2015

Download the presentation slides

A Home Tookit for Primary Prevention of Influenza by Individuals and Families (pdf)
Engineering Effective Responses to Influenza Outbreaks (pdf)

About the Presentation

It’s not too early to plan now for the next flu season: Research shows that your organization’s workforce could suffer a decrease of 20 percent to 30 percent. If you run a lean shop, that’s a lot of lost capacity!

In this webinar, MIT Professor Richard C. Larson will highlight results of a six-year research project he codirected in collaboration with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He will discuss:

  • how to educate your staff on behavioral changes that they and their family members can make to reduce the chances of getting sick;
  • ways to alter business processes to reduce infection pathways; and
  • why it is imperative to start planning now.

A Q&A will follow the presentation.

Be proactive! Join us­­ and learn how to keep your employees and your business healthy.

About the Speaker

Richard C. Larson, PhD, is the Mitsui Professor of Engineering Systems and founding director of the Center for Engineering System Fundamentals at MIT. He focuses his research and practice on operations in the services industries, primarily technology-enabled education, health, disaster preparedness, urban service systems, queuing, logistics, and workforce planning. He is past president of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and an INFORMS Founding Fellow, as well as a recipient of INFORMS’ President’s Award, Lanchester Prize, and Kimball Medal. He has served and continues to serve on a variety of panels and committees of the NAE and Institute of Medicine.

Larson’s current MIT research includes modeling and broader analysis of infectious diseases, especially pandemic influenza, Middle East respiratory syndrome, and Ebola. The CDC, IBM, and the Sloan Foundation have supported this work. The published research results include a Best-Paper-of-the-Year award (Value in Health) and AMA recognition as content valuable for physicians who received professional PRA Category 1 Credits for taking and passing an online quiz relating to one of our papers (“Home Flu Kit”).

About the Series

The MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series, sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program, features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.
 

Challenging Common Software Design Principles

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Christine Miyachi, Systems Engineer and Architect, Xerox Corporation; SDM Alumna

Date: June 15, 2015

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

miyachi.thumb

Christine Miyachi, SDM ’00

Does deviating from common software design principles necessarily produce bad software? In this webinar, Xerox systems engineer and architect Christine Miyachi will explore what lessons software designers can learn from other areas of design. Great furniture designers, for example, may iterate on a particular chair design even when the iterations aren’t necessarily improvements. They simply produce different beautiful and functional chairs. This webinar will explore such questions as:

  • Must software form always follow function?
  • Can software be designed for beauty first?
  • What happens when software designers break the single responsibility principle (i.e. a class is responsible for one part of the functionality only)?
  • What are the pros and cons of abandoning common principles in crafting software?

A Q&A will follow the discussion. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Christine Miyachi has almost 30 years of experience working for startups and large corporations. She writes a blog about software architecture and currently serves as a systems engineer and architect at Xerox Corporation. She works on Xerox’s Extensible Interface Platform, a software platform that enables developers to use standard web-based tools to create server-based applications that can be configured for the multifunction peripheral’s touch-screen user interface. Miyachi holds several patents. She graduated from the University of Rochester with a B.S. in electrical engineering. She also holds two MIT degrees: an S.M. in technology and policy/electrical engineering and computer science and, as an SDM alumna, an S.M. in engineering and management. She is currently chair of the IEEE Cloud Computing Steering Committee.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Creating a Technology Strategy and Roadmap for Global Manufacturing at Merck

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Anando A. Chowdhury, Director of Product Design: Innovation to Operation, Global Science, Technology, & Commercialization, Merck & Co., Inc.; SDM Alumnus

Date: June 1, 2015

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Anando Chowhury Environmental Portrait

Anando A. Chowdhury

In 2011, Merck & Co., Inc. began developing a technology strategy and roadmap for global manufacturing that would provide expanded access to pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and biologics for such ailments as diabetes, cancer, infectious diseases, and for neurological, cardiovascular, and reproductive health. This webinar will explore the tools and techniques drawn from MIT’s System Design & Management (SDM) program that were used to create Merck’s leading-edge capability. It will also review major lessons derived from the roadmap’s successful implementation and execution over the past four years.

SDM alumnus Anando A. Chowdhury, director of product design: innovation to operation for Global Science, Technology, & Commercialization at Merck, will describe:

  • the development of a framework engineered to manage complexity and deliver clear guidance to the organization on where and how to focus effort;
  • the process of incorporating key lessons from across multiple industries with the depth of insight needed to transcend different technical disciplines; and
  • lessons learned through the successful implementation and execution of the roadmap over the past four years.

If you would like to be in touch with Chowdhury, you may contact him by email.

About the Speaker

Anando A. Chowdhury is the director of product design: innovation to operations in Merck & Co., Inc.’s Global Science, Technology, & Commercialization division. He is responsible for developing primary, secondary, and tertiary product, packaging, and logistics solutions that are patient-, customer-, and value-chain-focused for all of Merck’s human health new product pharmaceutical, vaccine, and biotech pipelines. He led the organizational strategy, management, and operations function for Global Science, Technology, & Commercialization and was accountable for the development, commercialization, launch, and technical support of all Merck products. He and his team were pivotal in establishing Merck’s small- and large-molecule late-stage development and commercialization models, creating and executing the manufacturing technology merger roadmap between Merck and Schering-Plough, creating Merck’s Quality by Design strategy, and establishing the company’s first-ever manufacturing technology roadmaps.

Prior to joining Merck, Chowdhury worked in product development, process engineering, equipment design, installation and commissioning, fundamental research and development, new business ventures, information systems and technologies, applied management sciences, and as an operations manager for two new businesses. He has worked at Eastman Kodak Company, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MDT Biologics of Getinge USA, Inc., the United Nations Children’s Fund, hospital systems, and has held positions and postings in Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, and France.

Chowdhury holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering and biomedical engineering from the University of Rochester and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and as an SDM alumnus, an M.S. in engineering and management from MIT. A Six Sigma Black Belt, he is also a graduate of Merck’s Business Leadership Program through Duke University’s Executive Program.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Architecture: Strategy and Product Development for Complex Systems

Bruce Cameron, Ph.D.

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Bruce Cameron, Ph.D.; Director, System Architecture Lab at MIT; Co-founder, Technology Strategy Partners

Date: May 4, 2015

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About the Presentation 

The value of the architecture of a system is increasingly recognized across diverse arenas, from power grids to mobile payment systems. As the “DNA” of a system, system architecture provides the basis for competitive advantage, so it’s no surprise that more than 100,000 professionals hold the title of system architect today, and many more are practicing that role under different titles. However, leveraging the role of the architect it to fullest advantage can be challenging.

In this webinar, Dr. Bruce Cameron will discuss the importance of architecture, outline challenges, and offer ways to address them. He will cover:

  • the nebulous boundaries of the term “architecture” and how to sharpen them;
  • the power of trading among several architectures early;
  • the analysis and methodologies of system architecture.

Dr. Cameron will draw from the recently published System Architecture: Strategy and Product Development for Complex Systems, which he co-authored with MIT Professor Edward Crawley and Cornell Prof. Daniel Selva.

About the Speaker

Bruce Cameron, Ph.D. is the Director of the System Architecture Lab at MIT, and a founder of consulting firm Technology Strategy Partners. He is currently part of the faculty team in MIT SDM’s core course and teaches system architecture and technology strategy at the MIT Sloan School of Management and School of Engineering. Previously, Dr. Cameron oversaw the MIT Commonality Study, which comprised over 30 firms and spanned eight years.

Previously, Dr. Cameron worked in high tech and banking, where he built advanced analytics for managing complex development programs. Earlier in his career, he was a system engineer at MDA Space Systems and built hardware that is currently in orbit.

Dr. Cameron received his undergraduate degree from the University of Toronto and S.M. and Ph.D. from MIT. He has authored 20 publications and supervised 30 graduate students.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Hadoop-Based Data Exploration for the Healthcare Safety Net—Technical and Sociocultural Challenges to Big Data Usability

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDavid Hartzband

David Hartzband, D.Sc., Research Affiliate, MIT Sociotechnical Systems Research Center

Date: April 6, 2015

Time: Noon — 1 p.m. EDT

Free and open to all

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About the Presentation

The concept of mining large, heterogeneous data sets (“big data”) to improve clinical outcomes and operational processes holds great promise for the healthcare industry. However, analytics have so far been underutilized by an essential component of the healthcare safety net—community health centers (CHCs), critical access hospitals, rural hospitals, and clinics. A look at the systemic reasons behind this lag offers useful lessons not only for healthcare, but also for many other industries.

In this webinar, David Hartzband, D.Sc., will outline a nonprofit-funded project designed to introduce Hadoop-based analytics into three CHCs and report preliminary results regarding data usability. Focusing on one clinical data set that goes back to 2009 and contains about 1 million diagnosis events, he will describe common challenges, including:

  • Accurately determining the annual number of patients served;
  • Addressing data quality idiosyncrasies, such as the mismatch of specific diagnosis codes with descriptions;
  • Tackling the substantial misalignment of clinical and financial data, which can make cost analysis impossible.

Data anomalies will be presented in the context of a large-scale cost/patient analysis, and the implications of these data anomalies will be discussed. Webinar attendees will gain insight into how to apply Hadoop-based analysis to a wide range of challenges in virtually any field.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

David Hartzband, D.Sc., is a research affiliate of the MIT Sociotechnical Systems Research Center. After a 25+-year career designing and developing software technologies—during which time he twice created billion-dollar revenue streams with products that he designed—he left industry to concentrate on healthcare information technology (HIT).

In the last 10 years, he has worked on the architecture of several of the largest health information exchanges in the country, designing and leading development of both practice management and electronic health records systems. In addition, he has consulted with many HIT companies, especially startups.

Hartzband recently served as principal investigator for a Department of Commerce/National Institute of Standards and Technology grant on providing trusted identities in cyberspace through the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace program, a White House initiative. He has also served as co-principal investigator for a Department of Health and Human Services project researching the use of electronic records to provide combined records for medical and behavioral health treatment. He continues to consult with several national groups working on healthcare transformation.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Systems Thinking in Mobile Networking: How Virtualization and Programming Change the Mobile Paradigm

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Kevin Shatzkamer

Kevin Shatzkamer


Kevin Shatzkamer, CTO of Mobile Networking and Distinguished Engineer, Brocade; SDM Alumnus

Date: March 23, 2015

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About the Presentation

The mobile phone network is among the most complex of complex systems, with tens of thousands of radios connecting thousands of physical locations performing hundreds of different tasks. Now mobile architecture is rapidly evolving, presenting new challenges as the distinction between physical and logical constraints change and the foundational assumptions upon which mobile networking was built shift.

As in any complex system, individual network functions have different availability, scalability, and performance-related metrics that affect the success of the mobile system as a whole. However, new tools and technologies, such as software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), now threaten to nullify one commonly held belief in networking: that a logical function must be contained within a physical boundary. This can be a game-changer.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Kevin Shatzkamer, CTO of mobile networking and distinguished engineer at Brocade, will:

  • provide an overview of the current architecture and mode of operations of mobile networks;
  • describe how systems thinking can be applied to highly complex, distributed problems in different arenas, using mobile networking as an example; and
  • offer general suggestions for industry and other domains.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

As CTO of mobile networking at Brocade, Kevin Shatzkamer is responsible for long-term strategy and architectural evolution at the intersection of cloud technologies, digital media assets, and mobility devices/networks. His work in these areas encompasses deep industry trend analysis, business strategy, and technical architecture and infrastructure evolution.

Shatzkamer works directly with customers on aligning long-term technology investment strategies with emerging trends. For mobile carriers, these architectures align with next-generation business models, including mobile + cloud, network function virtualization, software-defined networking, analytics, and digital media distribution and delivery.

Prior to joining Brocade in 2014, Shatzkamer worked for 15 years at Cisco. He has more than 50 patents issued or pending. He holds a B.Eng. from the University of Florida and an M.B.A. from Indiana University. As an SDM alumnus, he also has an M.S. in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Architecture and Bitcoin: The Opportunities and Challenges

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesSascha Boehme

Sascha Boehme, SDM Alumnus and Consultant, Boehme BankIT Consulting

Date: March 9, 2015

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About the Presentation

Bitcoin is far more than just another form of money. It is a crypto-currency and a peer-to-peer network that enables the secure transfer of a unique piece of digital property over the Internet, with no need for a trusted third party. This nascent technology has given rise to previously inconceivable business possibilities, such as instant, free, and secure money transfer, yet Bitcoin is still struggling with price volatility, security concerns, and regulatory hurdles.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Sascha Boehme will offer a context for understanding how to innovate with Bitcoin. He will discuss:

  • Bitcoin’s history;
  • its revolutionary system architecture, which combines existing technologies and concepts in an entirely new way; and
  • how to think about the challenges and opportunities that arise from Bitcoin’s unique properties.

Whether Bitcoin succeeds or fails, distributed trust networks that enable strangers to conduct transactions remotely without the need for a neutral third party are here to stay.

Understanding the promise and potential pitfalls of this technology is essential to creating new paradigms that will not only spur businesses to evolve, but will provide commercial opportunities to the world’s roughly 2.5 billion unbanked people, opening the path to the alleviation of global poverty and oppression. The speaker will offer other examples.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Sascha Boehme is a consultant for Boehme BankIT Consulting specializing in systems engineering for financial institutions. He has worked as an IT consultant for the banking industry in Germany, where he built business intelligence and risk management systems. Previously, he spent 10 years working on the fixed income trading desks of investment banks including UBS, CIBC, and Dresdner Bank in London and New York. His areas of expertise include financial product management and sales, building decision support systems, and business process optimization.

At MIT, Boehme wrote his thesis on “Bitcoin as a Peer-to-Peer Network for International Payments.” He was a teaching assistant for a software systems architecture course, a research assistant at the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, and a finalist in the MIT $100K Pitch Contest with his idea for a peer-to-peer money transfer business.

Boehme recently graduated from the MIT System Design and Management program with an M.S. in engineering and management. He also holds a B.A./ M.A. in business administration from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, where he specialized in banking and finance with a minor in computer science.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

How to Open-source the Creative Process: Democratizing Innovation, Product Design and Development, and Technology Strategy

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesAli Almossawi

Ali Almossawi, Data Visualization Engineer, Mozilla; Author, An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments; and SDM Alumnus

Date: February 23, 2015

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About the Presentation

The creative process is a combination of engineering and design decisions, experimentation, iteration, integration, informed decisions, and luck—all of which hopefully culminate in a marketable artifact. The creator, with all the tools and knowledge available to him or her, is often presumed to know best. But, that’s not always the case.

In this webinar, SDM alumnus Ali Almossawi will discuss the benefits of expanding the creative process through open-sourcing on the Internet, where there are more creators, fewer industry gatekeepers, and endless opportunities to engage directly with users. He will:

  • describe a model for open-sourcing the creative process and how it can be used to build a self-sustaining product or business;
  • outline the key players—often a combination of professionals with expertise in technology, business, and/or design;
  • discuss what is needed for team members to work together effectively—and the pitfalls to avoid;
  • provide examples of failure, success, and failure leading to success; and
  • offer next steps that can be adapted and applied across all industries.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Ali Almossawi holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT and a master’s degree in software engineering from Carnegie Mellon. He has spent time at Harvard, the Software Engineering Institute, and the MIT Media Lab, where his research involved creating predictive models of source-code quality as well as investigating architecture adaptability in software.

Almossawi currently resides in San Francisco, where he works on Firefox data visualization for Mozilla. He is the author of An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments, which has been read by 1.4 million people, and is currently writing a novella about computer algorithms. His work has appeared in Scientific American, Wired, Fast Company, and more.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

To Model or Not to Model? Formalizing the Conceptual Modeling Thought Process to Benefit Engineers and Scientists

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDov Dori

Dov Dori, Lecturer, Engineering Systems Division, MIT, and Harry Lebensfeld Chair in Industrial Engineering, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology

Date: February 9, 2015

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About the Presentation

Conceptual modeling began informally. As human beings evolved and began to make sense of the world, many constructed mental models of themselves as agents in a hostile environment. These models enabled them to make predictions and test hypotheses about behaviors that might increase their survival rate.

Similarly, engineers today develop mental models of the systems they design, and scientists construct such models to understand, explain, and predict natural phenomena. Conceptual models are both visual-graphical and verbal-textual, but almost always implicit and informal. Object-Process Methodology (OPM), recently approved as ISO 19450, is both an explicit conceptual modeling language and a paradigm for approaching systems modeling. OPM is bimodal. It represents the same model both graphically, in a single kind of diagram, and textually, in a subset of English—thus communicating to both sides of the brain.

This webinar will introduce the principles of OPM and demonstrate the value of OPM-based conceptual modeling in a variety of engineering and science domains. During this session, Professor Dov Dori will:

  • define and exemplify conceptual modeling and its benefits in various disciplines;
  • introduce OPM as a formal modeling language that is agile, lightweight, compact, and easy to learn;
  • show how OPM has benefited engineers and scientists in various disciplines; and
  • present a vision for the future role of conceptual modeling in improving endeavors across science and engineering.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Dov Dori has been affiliated with MIT’s Engineering Systems Division intermittently since 2000. He is the Harry Lebensfeld Chair in industrial engineering and head of the Enterprise System Modeling Laboratory within the Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management at Technion—Israel Institute of Technology.

Dori’s research interests include model-based systems engineering, conceptual modeling of complex systems, systems architecture and design, software and systems engineering, and systems biology. He invented and developed Object-Process Methodology (the ISO 19450 Standard), has authored more than 300 publications, and has mentored more than 50 graduate students.

Dori previously served as associate editor of IEEE Transaction on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence and is currently associate editor of Systems Engineering, a publication of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE). He is a fellow of INCOSE and of the International Association for Pattern Recognition. He is also a member of the Omega Alpha Association, the international honor society for systems engineering, and a senior member of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and of the Association for Computing Machinery. Learn more about Dori here.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

How to Analyze and Visualize a Large, Interconnected Software System: A Study of Fedora 20 with Lessons for All

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDaniel Sturtevant

Daniel Sturtevant, Ph.D., CEO, Silverthread, Inc., and SDM Alumnus
David Allan, Director of Software Engineering, Silverthread, Inc.David Allan

Date: January 26, 2015

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About the Presentation

When working inside a system of enormous scale, people often understand only the part with which they are involved. As long as the whole system is sufficiently modular, people tend to believe they can construct reasonably reliable mental models of their component and how it interfaces with others. However, this is not always safe; research shows that hidden structures can interconnect components of a complex system at higher levels, causing organizational problems that are difficult to see, understand, and address.

Fedora 20 is composed of more than 2,500 interconnected software packages developed and managed by globally distributed teams. Estimates have placed the number of software developers who have contributed at over 100,000. In this webinar, Daniel Sturtevant and David Allan will present research that addresses the architectural complexity of the Fedora Linux operating system and software collection. They will discuss:

  • How to visualize the system at multiple levels (including the view from 60,000 feet) and gain meaningful insights about its hidden structure;
  • How to benchmark across the system to better understand its composition and variations in complexity and quality; and
  • How this approach might be applied to other software systems.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Daniel Sturtevant, Ph.D., is an SDM alumnus and graduate of the MIT Engineering Systems Division doctoral program. He holds a research post at Harvard Business School where he studies software architecture and the software development process. He is also the CEO of Silverthread, Inc., a firm that helps organizations gain insights into business risk, productivity, and complexity. Prior to cofounding Silverthread, Dr. Sturtevant spent many years in the software field where he built Linux-based supercomputers, conducted research and development in cyber warfare, and helped manage a companywide effort to drive modularity into the source-code for a family of software products.

David Allan is director of software engineering at Silverthread, Inc. He has been building scalable systems for 15 years, designing technology to solve real-world problems. He previously worked as a software development manager at Red Hat, developing Linux device drivers and managing operations for a hosted software provider. He holds a J.D. from the University of Utah and an A.B. in English from Kenyon College.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

A Systems Approach to Fostering Innovation Ecosystems within Academic and Business Communities

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesRajesh Nair

Rajesh Nair, Visiting Scholar, Tata Center for Technology and Design, MIT; Founder, Chairman, and CTO, Degree Controls, Inc.; and SDM Alumnus

Date: December 1, 2014

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About the Presentation

Although startups are key to economic growth and job creation, many people—particularly students—have a negative attitude toward entrepreneurship. Fear of failure, constant uncertainty, and financial constraints combine with a lack of training in needed skills to discourage potential entrepreneurs.

In this webinar, Rajesh Nair, a visiting scholar at MIT’s Tata Center, successful entrepreneur, and SDM alumnus, will describe a systems-based experiment conducted in India at small engineering colleges with no active entrepreneurship initiatives. This research addressed the following questions:

  • Is it possible to bring about a positive change in the average student’s attitude toward entrepreneurship?
  • Can suitable ecosystems be created at colleges to provide nurturing environments in which entrepreneurship and innovation can flourish?

Nair will describe:

  • a specially designed experiential curriculum and training in innovation, fabrication, and entrepreneurship;
  • how students created new ventures by interacting with their local communities to validate problems for business opportunities, ideate solutions, and fabricate prototypes—in effect creating healthy entrepreneurship ecosystems within their academic institutions and surrounding communities;
  • how these strategies can be applied and adapted by other academic institutions; and
  • how students’ attitudes toward entrepreneurship changed.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Rajesh Nair is a researcher at MIT who is developing methods to catalyze the work of community innovators and entrepreneurs to create local entrepreneurship ecosystems. His experiments in India have generated several startups (see Teaching Entrepreneurship in India). His current mission is to create 1,000 entrepreneurs in the next three years using the method he developed at MIT.

Nair is a product designer and a serial entrepreneur. The company he founded most recently, Degree Controls Inc., serves companies in the thermal design of high-reliability electronic products in medical, information technology, military, and consumer markets. He has developed several industry-standard products and holds 13 US patents. He received the Entrepreneur of the Year award from the New Hampshire High Tech Council and was a finalist at Ernst & Young’s EoY-New England program. As an MIT SDM alumnus, he holds an MS in engineering and management. He also has master’s degrees in manufacturing engineering (from the University of Massachusetts—Amherst) and electronic product design (from the Indian Institute of Science—Bangalore). He founded the annual TechTop National Innovation Competition in India, which is currently in its ninth year. As a visiting scholar at MIT’s Tata Center, he focuses on commercializing technologies developed at the center. He recently delivered a TEDxBeaconStreet talk on starting up entrepreneurs.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Developing Analytics for the Healthcare Safety Net: A Systems Approach

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDavid Hartzband

David Hartzband, D.Sc., Research Affiliate, Engineering Systems Division, MIT

Date: November 17, 2014

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About the Presentation

Whether focused on big data, small data, or both, analytics is transforming healthcare by enabling better decision-making in both clinical and operational areas. However, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, “Organizations that are part of the healthcare safety net, i.e., that deliver care in a variety of settings such as public hospitals, community health centers … free clinics, special service providers, and in some cases, physician networks and school-based clinics that deliver care to low-income, vulnerable patients are at risk.” Although many facilities receive state and federal funding, safety nets remain locally organized and managed, which means there is a patchwork of systems with little coordination and integration. Consequently, many care providers are poorly positioned to take advantage of advances in information technology (IT).

In this webinar, David Hartzband, D.Sc. will discuss current research devoted to learning how best to help federally qualified health centers make use of contemporary analytics. He will discuss:

  • Education for staff in urban and rural health centers that will help them distinguish between current data reporting practices and the kinds of inquiries that can be performed through new thinking and new technical approaches;
  • Why analytics is not an IT function, a software package, or a technical protocol;
  • The types of analytics-based inquiries that can be used to support an organization’s goals and significantly facilitate strategic decision-making; and
  • The systems approach to every aspect of a project, including development of an analytic infrastructure as well as cultivation of an environment in which different kinds of strategic questions can be asked and the results appropriately interpreted.

This webinar will also offer an overview of project assumptions, the process used to engage the health centers, the progress made to date, and the results of preliminary inquiries.

A Q&A will follow the presentation.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

David Hartzband, D.Sc., is a research affiliate in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division. After a 25-plus-year career designing and developing software technologies—during which time he twice designed and led the implementation of products with billion-dollar revenue streams—he moved into the field of healthcare information technology (HIT). In the last 10 years, he has worked on the architecture of several of the largest health information exchanges in the country, designed and led the development of both practice management and electronic health records (EHR) systems, and consulted with many HIT companies, especially startups.

He recently served as principal investigator for a Department of Commerce/National Institute of Standards and Technology grant on providing trusted identities in cyberspace through the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace program, a White House initiative. He is in the process of completing a U.S. Health and Human Services research project investigating the use of EHRs to provide combined records for medical and behavioral health treatment.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

 

Integrated Design for Product Success

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesMatthew S. Kressy

Matthew S. Kressy, Director and Senior Lecturer, Integrated Design & Management, MIT

Date: November 3, 2014

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About the Presentation

Excellence in product design is at the heart of success, yet more products fail than succeed. Integrating a balance of design, engineering, and business is critical, but challenging. Getting it right in the midst of uncertainty can be messy, complex, and daunting.

In this webinar, Matthew S. Kressy, director of MIT’s newly established Integrated Design & Management master’s degree track, will discuss why product designs can succeed or fail. He will provide a high-level overview of strengths and weaknesses in currently popular design approaches. Then he will discuss:

  • Characteristics of good design approaches that are interdisciplinary and user-centered, yet also maximize creativity and embrace failure as a stepping stone;
  • Characteristics of weak design approaches, such as siloed thinking and fear of failure;
  • The importance of early integration of all product development disciplines;
  • A new model for educating design, engineering, and management professionals to be “tri-lingual” in these disciplines and work together more effectively;
  • General guidelines and a checklist to help organizations accurately assess their resources; and
  • Next steps to consider.

A Q&A will follow the presentation.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Matthew S. Kressy, director of MIT SDM’s newly established Integrated Design & Management (IDM) master’s degree track, currently co-teaches product design and development classes at MIT and the Rhode Island School of Design. He has also co-taught at Harvard, Babson College, and Olin School of Engineering.

Kressy has extensive expertise in globally distributed, interdisciplinary, design-driven product development, from deep user research and concept generation to prototype iteration, risk reduction, and volume manufacturing. An entrepreneur and founder of Designturn, he has designed, invented, engineered, and manufactured more than 100 products for Fortune 500 clients and others, including Kronos, Massachusetts General Hospital, APC, the US Army, and Teradyne Corporation.

He holds a B.F.A. in industrial design from the Rhode Island School of Design.

About MIT Integrated Design & Management

Formally launched in 2014 as a new track within the MIT System Design and Management (SDM) program, Integrated Design & Management (IDM) integrates industrial design, engineering design, and other design disciplines with management. Offered jointly by the MIT School of Engineering and Sloan School of Management, IDM is targeted at early to mid-career professionals and will be taught in an innovative design studio format. Graduates will be awarded a master of science degree in engineering and management.

Potential students and industry partners can learn more about IDM by contacting idm@mit.edu. Please visit the IDM website for further information.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

A Systems Approach to the 2014 Midterm Elections: Voting to Achieve Systemwide Change

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesNicholas A. Ashford, Ph.D.

Nicholas A. Ashford, Ph.D., J.D. Professor of Technology and Policy, MIT Director, MIT Technology and Law Program

Date: October 20, 2014

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About the Presentation

Elections matter—especially the 2014 midterms. The challenges are especially acute this year because:

  • Gridlock, corruption, and diversionary tactics have compromised sound legislative and programmatic changes, as well as an independent judiciary; and
  • Media and self-serving politicians are sidestepping the debates we need to have around major issues.

Sustainable progress requires tackling a complex set of challenges that, if properly considered and addressed with the rigor of systems thinking, can help the United States reach a new level of inclusion and opportunity for all. This webinar will help explain how our elected officials can do better.

Professor Nicholas A. Ashford will discuss the most important barrier to making the transformation to a more sustainable financial and industrial system—lock-in or path dependency due to:

  • failure to envision, design, and implement policies that achieve co-optimization—i.e. mutually reinforcing, societal goals for economic welfare, environmental quality, and employment/earning capacity; and
  • entrenched economic and political interests that gain from the present system and current trends.

Ashford will describe a systems-based approach to facilitating technological and institutional changes while “opening up the participatory and political space” to enable new voices to contribute to solutions.

Insights from the book Ashford coauthored with Ralph Hall, Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development: Transforming the Industrial State (2011, Yale University Press), will inform the presentation.

About the Speaker

Nicholas A. Ashford is a professor of technology and policy at MIT and director of MIT’s Technology and Law Program. He holds both a Ph.D. in chemistry and a law degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in economics. At MIT, he teaches courses jointly listed with the Engineering Systems Division (ESD)/Engineering, the Sloan School, and Urban Studies. He has also supervised graduate theses in the Technology and Policy Program, ESD, SDM, and the Master of Science in Management Studies. He has coauthored seven books and several hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Where’s the Money? Migrating to a Global Digital Monetary Ecosystem

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer, Sloan School of Management and Engineering Systems Division, MIT

Date: September 22, 2014

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About the Presentation

The digital revolution is already hitting our wallets—increasingly turning money into information in the cloud while transforming mobile devices into windows on a global, digital economy. However, the evolution to a digital money ecosystem involves much more than converting cash, checks, and credit cards from physical to digital objects.

In this webinar, Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger will begin with a brief history of the evolution to a digital money ecosystem, then offer insights into its incessantly changing components and challenges. Attendees will hear the latest thinking on:

  • global payment infrastructures;
  • management of personal identities and financial data;
  • international financial flows among institutions (and between institutions and individuals);
  • government regulatory regimes; and
  • issues related to security, privacy, and more.

He will also discuss major opportunities across all industries and nonprofit sectors—as well as challenges.

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, Ph.D., retired from IBM in May of 2007 after a 37-year career with the company, where his primary focus was on innovation and technical strategy. He is currently a visiting lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and Engineering Systems Division, adjunct professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School, and executive-in-residence at New York University’s Center for Urban Science and Progress. He writes a weekly blog, irvingwb.com, and is a regular contributor to The Wall Street Journal‘s “CIO Journal.” He has an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Move Over, Big Data! How Small, Simple Models Can Yield Big Insights

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesRichard C. Larson

Richard C. Larson, Ph.D., Mitsui Professor of Engineering Systems and Director of the Center for Engineering Systems Fundamentals, MIT

Date: September 8, 2014

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About the Presentation

Today’s emphasis on big data and data analytics may leave some folks thinking that management and policy insights can only arise from the analysis of millions of data entries. Nothing could be further from the truth! Sometimes less is more. In fact, an excess of numbers can engender more headaches than insight.

In this talk, managers and policymakers will learn how simple mathematical models of systems can improve intuition and lead to better decisions. Dr. Larson will provide concrete examples from his professional research and consulting engagements, then discuss general applications to industry. He will cover:

  • Flaws of averages—what they are and how to avoid them;
  • Square root laws—how to apply them to locating facilities and more;
  • Singularities—why and how managers of service systems must schedule idle time for servers or face huge waiting lines (aka the “elbow effect”);
  • Simple difference equations—how to use them to discover major system instabilities when inputs are year-to-year gross revenues;
  • Going viral—how a major demography parameter can apply to exponential explosiveness in many business sectors; and
  • Lateral thinking—and how it can sometimes make a problem go away.

Learn to cut to the chase, see the big picture, and stay out of the weeds!

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Professor Richard C. Larson has been a member of the MIT faculty for more than four decades, in four different academic departments. During this time he has also led an off-campus consulting firm that has invented novel approaches—inspired from operations research and industrial engineering—to complex systems problems in the private and public sectors. He has served as president of both the Operations Research Society of America and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences. He has worked closely with a wide variety of organizations, including—in the private sector—banks, airlines, retailers, industrial gas distributors, amusement parks, and—in the public sector—the City of New York, many public school systems, the U.S. Postal Service, the World Bank, the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and numerous police departments. At MIT he has founded several initiatives, including MIT Learning International Networks Consortium and MIT Blended Learning Open Source Science or Math Studies.

Dr. Larson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and cochairs a major panel on the application of systems engineering to health, cosponsored by the NAE and the Institute of Medicine.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Architecture and the Evolution of E-Governance in Estonia: Lessons for Industries Around the World

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Andres Kütt, SDM ’11, Head Software Architect, Republic of Estonia

Date: July 21, 2014

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About the Presentation

Governments today operate in an increasingly globalized, interconnected ecosystem. Many look to e-services to provide better citizen services, but too often they find themselves stuck in the old paradigm of approaching a complex technical challenge from the perspective of policy-making and public governance.

This webinar offers an approach, based on systems thinking, to developing a technical framework for e-government architecture governance. This strategy can be applied to design and manage the system architecture of any loosely coupled, decentralized organization—whether governmental, corporate, academic, or nonprofit.

In this presentation, SDM alumnus Andres Kütt will:

  • describe the architectural challenges faced by governments implementing electronic services;
  • outline the thinking behind developing an architecture governance framework for e-governments;
  • present a framework developed for e-government, along with examples; and
  • explain how the framework applies to Estonia’s e-governance system, which is one of the most advanced in the world.

A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Andres Kütt is the Republic of Estonia’s head software architect. He has more than 20 years of experience in software development for the financial and telecom sectors in both public and private organizations. Over the past 10 years, his focus has gradually shifted toward system architecture, a change that was strongly supported by his studies at the MIT System Design and Management (SDM) program. Through SDM he earned an S.M. in engineering and management from MIT; he also holds an M.B.A. from the Estonian Business School and a B.S. in mathematical statistics from the University of Tartu.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Architecture for Corporate Innovation

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesMona Vernon

Mona M. Vernon, SDM ’09, Vice President of Data Innovation Lab, Thomson Reuters

Date: July 14, 2014

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About the Presentation

Corporate innovation is no longer the sole responsibility of research and development units; it is becoming a real and urgent priority for CEOs. However, managing innovation is hardly ever as simple as consultants and social software vendors make it sound. In some cases, well-intentioned initiatives can have damaging, unintended consequences ranging from wasting valuable effort to disenfranchising employees.

Designing and deploying successful corporate innovation initiatives require an appreciation and application of basic system architecture principles. In this webinar, SDM alumna Mona M. Vernon will share heuristics for managing corporate innovation, with specific and actionable recommendations to consider when setting up a new initiative.

The presentation will:

  • make the case for the importance of system architecture for managing innovation;
  • define key concepts such as “lean startup” and “open innovation”;
  • address the implications of big data technologies on managing innovation; and
  • share data-driven insights from several industries on the strengths and weaknesses of common innovation tools.

A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Mona M. Vernon is currently building the Data Innovation Lab at Thomson Reuters. The lab will partner with internal business unit teams, customers, and third parties (such as startups and academics) to develop data-driven innovations. Previously, she ran the Emerging Technology group at Thomson Reuters and launched the Open Innovation Challenge program across the enterprise.

Vernon holds a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Tufts University and an S.M. in engineering and management from MIT, which she earned through the MIT System Design and Management (SDM) program. Her SDM thesis research focused on the role of customer experience in digital business strategy. Prior to joining Thomson Reuters, she worked in technology startups in product development and management.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Hacking Medicine and the Rx It Offers for Innovation in All Industries

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesAndrea Ippolito

Andrea Ippolito, SDM ’11, Ph.D. Student, Engineering Systems, MIT
Allison Yost, Ph.D. Candidate, Mechanical Engineering, MITAllison Yost

Date: June 16, 2014

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About the Presentation

Based at the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship, MIT Hacking Medicine brings together stakeholders who are passionate about changing the status quo in healthcare. The “hacking” approach fosters an ecosystem of empowerment for launching disruptive healthcare solutions. To date, more than 16 hackathons have been held across four continents, resulting in more than 600 idea pitches and the formation of more than a dozen companies—including PillPack, Podimetrics, Smart Scheduling, RubiconMD, Eagle Health Supplies, and Twiage.

In this webinar, you will learn how to apply the hacking approach to your industry and domain. Based on their experience in hacking medicine, MIT’s Andrea Ippolito and Allison Yost will:

  • discuss the hacking philosophy and the powerful promise of this approach;
  • describe what is needed to short-circuit (and continue to short-circuit) the flaws in innovation; and
  • share their mantras for hacking healthcare and medicine and reveal ways to develop mantras for innovation in your organization.

A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speakers

SDM alumna Andrea Ippolito is a Ph.D. student in engineering systems at MIT. While at SDM, she served as a research assistant in the MIT Lean Advancement Initiative, where she and fellow team members worked directly with the US Army’s chief of tele-health to architect the future delivery system for the US Department of Defense. Prior to coming to MIT, she worked as a product innovation manager at athenahealth and as a research scientist at Boston Scientific Corporation. Ippolito holds a B.S. in biological engineering and an M.Eng. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University.

Allison Yost is a Ph.D. candidate in mechanical engineering at MIT. Her research focuses on designing microfluidic devices at the nanoscale for medical and biotech applications. She aspires to be an entrepreneur in the healthcare and medical space. Yost received her S.M. in mechanical engineering from MIT and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of New Hampshire.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Maturation of Model-Based Systems Engineering: OPM as the ISO Conceptual Modeling Language Standard

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDov Dori

Dov Dori, Ph.D., Visiting Professor, Engineering Systems Division, MIT

Date: June 2, 2014

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About the Presentation

Model-based systems engineering promotes the use of modeling and models as focal design artifacts to enhance the rigor and robustness of systems engineering activities throughout the various phases of a system’s life cycle—with an emphasis on the early, conceptual phases.

The Object Management Group’s Systems Modeling Language (SysML) and Object-Process Methodology (OPM) are the two conceptual modeling languages currently in use. In this presentation, MIT Visiting Professor Dov Dori will:

  • highlight the working principles of OPM, with examples from various domains;
  • explain the differences between OPM and SysML; and
  • present the upcoming ISO 19450 OPM standard.

A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Dov Dori is a visiting professor in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division. He is the Harry Lebensfeld Chair in Industrial Engineering and head of the Enterprise System Modeling Laboratory at the Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Management, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Weizmann Institute of Science, an M.Sc. in operations research from Tel Aviv University, and a B.Sc. in industrial engineering and management from Technion. His research interests include model-based systems engineering, conceptual modeling of complex systems, system architecture and design, software and systems engineering, and systems biology. Dori invented and developed Object-Process Methodology (OPM), the emerging ISO 19450 standard. He has authored about 300 publications and mentored 48 graduate students. He has chaired nine international conferences or workshops. He is an INCOSE fellow and a fellow of the International Association for Pattern Recognition. He is also a member of the International Honor Society for Systems Engineering, Omega Alpha Association.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Risks and Mitigation Approaches for Business System Integration

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDaniel Mark Adsit

Daniel Mark Adsit, SDM ’13, Principal, Mergence Systems

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Date: May 19, 2014

About the Presentation

The successful integration of new technologies is essential to continual success in today’s fast-moving global economy, enabling businesses to upgrade their systems to be more effective, reliable, and scalable. Improved logistics systems, for example, have streamlined global supply chains by using technologies to optimize inventory levels across multiple warehouses. Similarly, modern transportation systems employ systems to break down traditional distance barriers and use new energy technologies to reduce their dependence on traditional fuels.

These transformational experiences require a critical alignment of business processes and technologies. Recognizing the importance of technology integration, organizations invest heavily in system implementation projects. Nevertheless, these projects often encounter unanticipated roadblocks to success.

In this webinar, Daniel Mark Adsit will discuss observed patterns in manufacturing and supply chain technology implementation projects across more than 15 countries—using examples that span diverse cultures, organizations, functions, departments, and technologies. The presentation will:

  • zero in on critical focus areas for businesses contemplating a major project;
  • highlight common yet unexpected obstacles;
  • discuss how stakeholder factors can significantly impact system adoption; and
  • outline steps to take to enhance strategies for addressing complex technology implementation dynamics.

A question-and-answer period will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Daniel Mark Adsit is the principal at Mergence Systems, which focuses on applying systems principles, methods, and tools to complex technology integration projects that impact critical business processes. Prior to forming Mergence Systems, he was a specialist in global supply chain and manufacturing integration projects in plants, sales offices, warehouses, and service centers at Eaton Corporation. He also served as a systems consultant to small organizations in the Ithaca, NY, area. In these roles, Adsit developed the ability to leverage complex technology to deliver practical value to users and stakeholders. As a graduate of SDM, he holds a joint master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT. He also has a bachelor’s degree in information science, systems, and technology from Cornell University.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Strategy, Simulation, and Analytics for the Complex World of Education

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDaniel J. Sturtevant

Daniel J. Sturtevant, Ph.D., MIT SDM Alumnus
Jeanne Contardo, Ph.D., Independent Education Consultant,Jeanne Contardo
Senior Advisor, Business-Higher Education Forum

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Date: May 5, 2014

About the Presentation

Getting education policy right is essential if the United States wishes to improve its high standard of living, economic strength, and societal health. But even education reforms based on sound research and crafted by well-meaning experts have often failed.

This webinar will review some of the many systems-based reasons why education policy is notoriously difficult to get right. For example:

  • Policy is often crafted by committee in highly political and polarized environments.
  • Individuals rarely understand how the system operates, what policy innovations will lead to good outcomes, or even why successful interventions work.
  • Policymakers seldom agree on the system’s purpose, how to prioritize conflicting goals, how to measure success, or what principles should guide their actions.

In short, policymakers do not use a rigorous, systems-based approach to address the complex technical, business, and socio-political challenge of educating all children for a better world.

This webinar’s presenters have collaborated on projects with K-12 schools, colleges, foundations, and at all levels of the government and the military. They will discuss using system dynamics to help diverse stakeholders understand the education system and design and test policies using simulation modeling and demo the new Aligned Workforce Model, which examines how workforce outcomes would change if policies were implemented that emphasized workplace competencies such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, and effective communication.

A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation.

About the Speaker

Daniel J. Sturtevant, Ph.D., is an SDM alumnus and recent graduate of the MIT Engineering Systems Division doctoral program. His SDM master’s thesis (conducted in partnership with Boeing) explored the 25-year decline in US-born engineering graduates despite their extremely high earning potential—a seemingly paradoxical violation of the law of supply and demand. Dr. Sturtevant has spent 15 years in the software field, where he built supercomputers, designed cryptosystems to prevent data theft, wrote Linux device drivers, and reverse-engineered computer hardware. He has built a variety of computer models applying system dynamics to explore educational questions and has worked with the Business-Higher Education Forum on several occasions to examine education problem of regional and national significance. He now works at Harvard Business School researching software architecture, its complexity, and its financial costs. He is also founding a startup, silverthread, Inc., focused on helping software development organizations reduce technical debt in large and long-lived systems. Dr. Sturtevant earned bachelor’s degrees in computer engineering and political science from Lehigh University.

Jeanne B. Contardo, Ph.D., is a higher education expert who specializes in strategic planning, cross-sector partnership development (particularly with the business sector), research and policy analysis, and project management. In recent years, her work has focused on the development of unique tools and resources that can influence education change and workforce alignment, including online simulation models, information clearinghouses, and a policy series analyzing broad education trends in science, technology, engineering, and math. Dr. Contardo earned her Ph.D. in higher education policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has a master’s degree in higher and post-secondary education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a bachelor’s degree (cum laude) in English from the University of Washington.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Applying Systems Thinking to Energy and Sustainability Challenges in Chile

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Jorge Moreno, SDM ’11, Cofounder, inodú
Donny Holaschutz, SDM ’10, Cofounder, inodú

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Date: April 7, 2014

About the PresentationDonny Holaschutz

Jorge Moreno

Over the past several years, Chile has faced an energy crisis that has impacted virtually all industries in that country. Caused by the scarcity of natural energy resources, tension between developers and conservationists, and a complex permitting process, the crisis has motivated energy and sustainability professionals to take a systems-based approach to mobilizing and managing projects in that country. The approach holds promise for planners around the world.

In this webinar, SDM alumni Jorge Moreno and Donny Holaschutz will present specific examples of how high-impact energy and sustainability projects have been driven from conception to operation in Chile.

Examples will include:

  • Working with the European Southern Observatory and the Chilean Energy Ministry to address planned increases in energy consumption while satisfying the need for reliable, cost-effective electricity and minimizing environmental impact;
  • Supporting small hydroelectric projects through codevelopment, planning, and risk management; and
  • Analyzing the complex systems at work in one of Chile’s largest food companies, identifying opportunities for improved energy efficiency, and developing an implementation plan.

The speakers will also provide a general plan of action for energy and sustainability solutions that can be customized and applied across industries. A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation.

We invite you to join us.

Learn more about this approach.

About the Speakers

SDM alumnus Jorge Moreno, an inodú cofounder, has extensive experience in the energy industry in the United States and Latin America. He holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

SDM alumnus Donny Holaschutz, an inodú cofounder, is a seasoned entrepreneur with experience in both for- and not-for-profit ventures related to clean and sustainable technology. He holds a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

‘Gap-Filling Organizations’: Competing at Speed in a Fast-Moving World

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Steven J. Spear, D.B.A., M.S., M.S., Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems Division and Sloan School of Management, MIT

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Date: March 24, 2014

About the Presentation

Steven J. Spear

Determining, documenting, and addressing the gaps between an organization’s business requirements for products and services and the systems and capabilities available to achieve them is a challenge common to all industries. Many companies address this issue by deploying internal functions that reactively fill these gaps. Although these efforts may differ by sector and context, those that are successful share several common characteristics in a systems-based approach that Dr. Steven J. Spear describes as the creation of “gap-filling organizations.”

In this webinar, Spear will highlight some of the factors that make gap-filling organizations so useful:

  • Speed—Responding faster and with shorter lead times than the larger anticipatory organizations that they support
  • Super-focus—Diving deep into specific problems to drive custom-tailored solutions
  • Network multipliers—Maintaining a relatively small organizational core and involving subject matter experts as necessary

Spear will also discuss the importance of a degree of institutional independence for gap-filling organizations and how it can be achieved. This presentation will give examples of gap-filling organizations in a variety of settings, identify the capabilities that make them effective and unique, and provide first steps in creating similar capabilities within your organizations.

A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

Steven J. Spear, D.B.A., M.S., M.S., is a senior lecturer in the Engineering Systems Division and the Sloan School of Management at MIT as well as a senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. He is the author of The High Velocity Edge and several articles published in managerial and medical journals.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Addressing Patient Wait Times with Systems Thinking

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Ali Kamil, SDM ’12, MIT SDM and Harvard Kennedy School of Government Graduate Student
Dmitriy Lyan, SDM ’11, Senior Product Manager, Amazon Web Services

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Date: March 10, 2014

About the Presentation

Ali Kamil, SDM '12

Dmitriy Lyan, SDM '11

The problem of prolonged and highly variable patient wait times in hospitals and emergency departments is well researched but as yet unsolved. This webinar will present findings from a 12-month study that explores the use of systems thinking to address this issue. The research was conducted at the LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) in Hyderabad, India, which has provided care for more than 15 million people—over 50 percent of whom were served free of charge.

The presentation will:

  • Outline the challenges faced by the LVPEI’s outpatient department (OPD) clinics, which serve 65 to 120 patients per day, with patient wait times ranging from 45 minutes to 6 hours;
  • Review time and motion studies of 430 patients at four LVEI OPDs;
  • Describe how researchers used qualitative and quantitative data to capture the operational structure of LVPEI OPD clinics and simulate daily patient flow;
  • Share contributions from key stakeholders;
  • Reveal the analysis used to quantify the impact of service demand, patient scheduling, and resource allocation factors on patient wait times and service quality; and
  • Summarize outcomes, including identifying the key policy levers that determine LVPEI’s effectiveness.

We invite you to join us.

About the Speakers

Ali Kamil is a graduate student at the MIT System Design and Management program and an M.P.A. candidate at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. His research interests lie in employing big data, social computing, and system dynamics–based simulation tools to identify patterns in human behavior, connectivity, and activities in low-resource settings—specifically in developing and emerging markets. He is a member of the MIT Media Lab’s Human Dynamics group directed by Professor Alex “Sandy” Pentland. He holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science and economics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

SDM alumnus Dmitriy Lyan has professional experience in both software development and investment management. While at SDM, his research focused on identifying critical performance factors and developing simulation models to tackle management challenges faced by organizations in healthcare and education. He is currently a senior product manager at Amazon Web Services. In addition to holding a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT, he has an M.S. in financial engineering from the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito School of Management at Claremont Graduate University and a B.S. in computer engineering from the University of California, San Diego.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Understanding Integrated Circuit Security Threats

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Asif Iqbal, SDM ’11
Power and Performance Program Manager, Apple Inc.

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Date: February 10, 2014

About the Presentation

Asif Iqbal

The security threats to critical hardware- and software-based infrastructure are greater than ever, no matter what the domain. Always at high risk for tampering and historically compromised by software and social engineering attacks, critical infrastructures in the military, finance, smart grid, healthcare, public records, commerce, and other domains now face a new threat—fake and infected integrated circuits that infiltrate high-value, data-based systems. These “hardware Trojans” can cause serious damage to financial, safety, security systems, and more.

The goal of this webinar is to increase awareness of this new cyber threat and to outline countermeasures. The presentation will include:

  • a discussion of the taxonomy of existing hardware security vulnerabilities and an overview of root causes;
  • an explanation of how hardware Trojans enable malicious tampering of an integrated circuit (IC) by adding to or modifying a system’s electrical circuitry;
  • a discussion of specific threats, such as confidential information leaks;
  • examples of how hardware Trojans can be activated via hardware modifications to microprocessors, digital signal processors, application-specific ICs and commercial off-the-shelf parts;
  • an explanation of why conventional design-time verification and post-manufacturing testing cannot readily be extended to detect hardware Trojans due to their stealth nature, inordinately large number of possible instances, and wide variety of structure and operating modes; and
  • a high-level discussion of combat strategies.

A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

About the Speaker

Asif Iqbal is a power and performance program manager at Apple Inc. His areas of expertise include digital design, system architecture, modeling, and simulation of electronic systems. Recently, he worked on developing the 12-hour battery life for the 2013 Macbook Air and the 2013 Mac Pro. He holds several patents in cellular communications, high-speed digital design, and signal processing. As an SDM graduate, he has a master’s degree in engineering and management from MIT. He also earned a bachelor’s degree in electronics and communication from Jamia Millia Islamia. His research interests include cyber security, high-performance architecture, and product and innovation management.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Supply Chain and Risk Management: Making the Right Decisions to Strengthen Operations Performance

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Ioannis Kyratzoglou, SDM ’11
Principal Software Systems Engineer, MITRE Corporation

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Date: January 27, 2014

About the Presentation

Ioannis Kyratzoglou

Today’s global corporations face risks that range from the controllable (price fluctuations, currency volatility, market changes) to those that are beyond control (natural disasters). To counter supply-chain disruptions, best-in-class organizations apply mature operations and risk management practices to reduce their exposure to these risks and maintain a competitive advantage.

This webinar will discuss the supply chain operations and risk management approaches of large companies. Specifically, the presenter will:

  • Describe company operations and financial performance in the face of supply chain disruptions;
  • Propose a systems-based framework and set of principles to help companies analyze and assess controllable and uncontrollable risks; and
  • Explain four key principles that companies can use to better manage supply chain risks and prepare for future opportunities.

The presenter will also discuss how leaders can use this systems-based framework to better understand a company’s position in the market relative to its competitors.

About the Speaker

Ioannis Kyratzoglou is a principal software systems engineer with the MITRE Corporation. He has 30 years of experience in systems engineering and in the acquisition of large-scale software systems. He has served as chief engineer, senior technical advisor, and project leader on key projects involving close collaboration with the customer. He is currently responsible for the development of predictive systems performance analytics techniques for a large-scale project. As an SDM alumnus, he holds an S.M. from MIT in engineering and management. He also earned an S.M. in mechanical engineering from MIT and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Architecting a Future Tele-Health Care System to Treat PTSD in the US Military

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesAndrea Ippolito

Andrea Ippolito, SDM ’11
Ph.D. student, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Download the presentation slides

Date: January 13, 2014

About the Presentation

This webinar will offer insight into how the US military can provide high-quality, cost-effective, timely access to health care for soldiers and their families — specifically those with post-traumatic stress disorders who may not have easy access to bricks and mortar facilities.

Andrea Ippolito will report on findings and recommendations by an MIT team that researched how technology can help reach those at risk. In this discussion, she will:

  • Define the term “tele-health” and explain how technology can be used to treat behavioral disorders at a distance;
  • Explain the overall systems-based approach the team used to evaluate the current state of tele-behavioral health within the military;
  • Detail the specific enterprise lenses of strategy, policy, organization, services, processes, infrastructure, and knowledge used to examine psychological heath-care services; and
  • Share the architecture recommendations proposed to deliver improved tele-behavioral health services to soldiers and their families in the future.

A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

About the Speaker

While at SDM, Andrea Ippolito served as a research assistant to the MIT Lean Advancement Initiative. There she and her fellow team members worked directly with the US Army’s chief of tele-health to architect the future delivery system for the US Department of Defense. Ippolito is currently a product innovation manager at athenahealth, as well as a student in the MIT Engineering Systems Division’s doctoral program. Prior to coming to MIT, she worked as a research scientist at Boston Scientific Corporation. Ippolito holds a B.S in biological engineering and an M.Eng. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Systems Thinking and the Inevitability of the Dreamliner Delays

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesYao Zhao, Ph.D.

Yao Zhao, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Rutgers University

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Date: December 2, 2013

About the Presentation

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner was the fastest-selling plane in the history of commercial aviation, but its development was a nightmare. The first flight was delayed by 26 months, and the first delivery was 40 months overdue with a cost overrun of at least $10 billion. Using the results of a comprehensive empirical study of the actual events and facts, this webinar will discuss strong evidence suggesting that the majority of delays were intentional.

Dr. Yao Zhao will:

  • Describe a mathematical modeling and analysis of economic drivers in joint development programs that showed the 787’s risk-sharing arrangement forced Boeing and its partners to share the “wrong” risk. This led each partner into a “prisoner’s dilemma” wherein delays were in the best interests of the firms even while they were driving themselves into disaster;
  • Discuss the reconciliation of the analysis with empirical evidence, which reveals the rationale behind many seemingly irrational behaviors that delayed this program; and
  • Suggest a new “fair sharing” partnership to share the “right” risk and greatly alleviate delays for development programs of this kind in the future.

This research was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Award No. 0747779.

About the Speaker

Dr. Yao Zhao is an associate professor in the department of Supply Chain Management and Marketing Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. He earned a B.E. in aerodynamics and holds a Ph.D. in industrial engineering and management sciences from Northwestern University. His current research interests lie in supply chain and project management interfaces with applications in the aerospace, pharmaceutical, energy, and agricultural industries.

He is a recipient of an NSF Career Award (2008-’13) for integrating supply chain and project management. He currently serves as an associate editor for Operations Research and Manufacturing & Service Operations Management.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Using System Dynamics to Support Startups, Stimulate the Economy, and Create More Jobs

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesFady Saad, SDM '11

Fady Saad, SDM ’11
Co-founder, ePowerhouse
R&D Financing Director, Vecna

Download the presentation slides

Date: November 18, 2013

About the Presentation

Startups have the potential to stimulate the economy and create employment opportunities, but their failure rate is high. How can we help them succeed?

In this webinar, Fady Saad, SDM ’11,cofounder and CEO of ePowerhouse, will present a systems-based approach to cultivating the key activities necessary for sustained startup success:

  • growing financially;
  • continuously fulfilling stakeholder needs and aspirations; and
  • adapting to the specific conditions of the company’s evolving ecosystem.

Using a system dynamics model he developed himself, Saad will then describe a holistic, system-driven conceptualization of a startup and its internal dynamics—including human resources, product development, customers, and finances—followed by a discussion of the high-leverage points in the ecosystem.

A question-and-answer period will follow the main presentation. We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Fady Saad, SDM ’11, is cofounder of ePowerhouse, which provides a cloud-based platform to help startups grow. He is the strategist behind the company’s business model, go-to-market strategy, and customer acquisition efforts. He is also the financing director for research and development at Vecna, a healthcare research lab.

While at MIT SDM, Saad’s research focused on designing and modeling startups as adaptive complex systems and on understanding the effects of entrepreneurship ecosystems on startups’ viability. Previously, Saad worked at Nokia Siemens Networks in the Middle East, North America, and Europe, where he led and managed multimillion-euro acquisitions and bids. In his prior work at Siemens, he led the merger between Siemens Com and Nokia Networks in Egypt involving more than 700 employees.

Saad recently consulted to the World Bank and its International Finance Corporation on issues related to implementing industrial and entrepreneurship policies in developing countries. He has been heavily involved with the startup and investment ecosystem in Boston and is a frequent speaker, panelist, and mentor in the field of entrepreneurship. His academic background includes complex systems, management, industrial engineering, and design.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Improving PTSD Treatment for US Military Personnel via Enterprise Architecting

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesElizabeth Cilley Southerlan

Elizabeth Cilley Southerlan, SDM ’12
Strategic IT and Operations Manager, Health and Life Sciences, Oliver Wyman

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Date: November 4, 2013

About the Presentation

North Carolina’s Camp Lejeune is the home of “expeditionary forces in readiness,” which include active– and civilian–duty Marines, their families, and other military personnel. This webinar centers on how SDM alumna Elizabeth Cilley Southerlan used enterprise architecting to investigate the current state of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment at the facility’s existing military psychological health enterprise (MPHE) and to provide suggestions for the facility’s transformation.

In this webinar, Southerlan will discuss using enterprise architecting to:

  • investigate the camp’s current (as–is) state; and
  • work in conjunction with multilevel analysis techniques to create a framework that could support the transformation of this complex, multilevel enterprise.

She will also describe takeaways—including dominant views of the organization, its processes, and the importance of stakeholder analysis—and review suggestions for the MPHE’s transformation to better serve our soldiers.

We hope you can join us!

About the Speaker

SDM alumna Elizabeth Cilley Southerlan holds an M.S. in management and engineering from MIT’s System Design and Management (SDM) program and a B.S. in industrial engineering from Pennsylvania State University. Currently a strategic IT and operations manager in health and life sciences at Oliver Wyman, she has also worked at Accenture.

She is the recipient of the 2012 SDM Student Award for Leadership, Innovation, and Systems Thinking.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

How to Secure and Grow Your Islands of Profit

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJonathan L.S. Byrnes

Jonathan L.S. Byrnes, Senior Lecturer, MIT

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Date: October 21, 2013

About the Presentation

“Islands of profit” is a term for the 20 percent to 30 percent of a business that provides all reported profits, subsidizing the 30 percent to 40 percent of the business that actually loses money. If you can secure and grow these islands of profit, you will retain the best customers for years, reaping huge profits and growth. If you fail to do so, your competitors will freeze you out of the best parts of the market for a long time.

This webinar will provide insights on how to accelerate your profitability through precision market targeting and sales execution. Dr. Jonathan L. S. Byrnes will describe how companies both large and small can increase market share while lowering costs and attracting new customers. He will cover:

  • How to lock in and grow the most profitable customers while reducing costs;
  • How to sell the most profitable products to the best customers to increase profits;
  • How to match sales and marketing resources to the best profit and growth opportunities; and
  • How successful companies have achieved this and how they managed the changes.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Dr. Jonathan L.S. Byrnes is an acknowledged authority on profitability management, with extensive experience spanning healthcare, transportation, software, retail, financial services, distribution, and other industries.

He has authored more than 100 books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions, including the award-winning Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink. He is the founding partner and CEO of Profit Isle, which combines big data and change management to accelerate profitability of client revenues.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

A Systems Approach to Airport Planning, Design, and Management

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesRichard de Neufville

Richard de Neufville, Ph.D.
Professor of Engineering Systems and of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT

Download the presentation slides

Date: September 23, 2013

About the Presentation

Airports routinely suffer breakdowns, delays, and disasters that are the exception in other fields. When viewed as systems, airports are relatively simple compared to the aircraft they serve and the global communication networks they use daily. So, what’s the problem, and why don’t these systems work together correctly?

World-renowned expert MIT Professor Richard de Neufville will use specific examples to detail the inside story and the fundamental problem: how airports are planned, designed, and managed. To illustrate, he will discuss designers’ and managers’ major blind spots, namely:

  • Neither viewing nor developing airports as systems. Each airport and terminal building is, almost without exception, custom-made.
  • Failing to design airport systems. Standard practice is to design bits and pieces for particular purposes, implicitly hoping that the assemblage will function well together for the airport’s eventual actual needs.
  • Operators who routinely fail to successfully manage waits and delays. This is true even though functionally the airport consists of sequences of queues.

A question-and-answer period will follow the main presentation.

About the Speaker

Professor Richard de Neufville is the coauthor of Airport Systems Planning, Design, and Management (McGraw-Hill, with MIT Professor Amedeo Odoni, and assisted by Dr. Peter Belobaba and Dr. Tom Reynolds). Its second edition appeared in May 2013 and is a 50 percent rewrite from the first edition, since so much has changed in the last decade.

Dr. de Neufville also cowrote Flexibility in Engineering Design (MIT Press 2011, with Dr. Stefan Scholtes), which shows how to use design flexibility to maximize the expected value of design in the context of the inevitable great uncertainty about future demands.

He is a member of the Leadership for US Airport Cooperative Research Program. His many prizes include the Sizer Award for the Most Significant Contribution to MIT Education, the McKelvey Award for Aviation Excellence, and the US Federal Aviation Administration Award for Excellence in Aviation Education.

He has extensive practical experience, having participated in airport planning, design, and management on all continents except Antarctica. Recent international projects concern the redevelopment of a second airport in Bangkok; the planning of a new runway in London; and the design of a terminal in Manila, the Philippines.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from past presentations can be viewed at http://sdm.mit.edu/voices/webinars.html

Systems Dynamics-Based Strategies for Introducing Alternative Fuel Vehicles in India

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesAbhijith Neerkaje

Abhijith Neerkaje, Program Manager, SanDisk, and SDM Alumnus
Sergey Naumov, Ph.D. Student, MIT Sloan School of Management, and SDM AlumnusSergey Naumov

Download the presentation slides

Date: September 9, 2013

About the Presentation

In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and oil consumption, India urgently needs to devise effective strategies for introducing fuel-efficient, nonpolluting, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the marketplace. The challenge: In India as in many countries, the internal combustion engine is the dominant vehicle power train. This has resulted in significant tailpipe emissions in congested cities.

In 2013, the Indian government unveiled the National Electric Mobility Mission Plan to promote AFV sales in a coordinated manner. Although many similar, well-intentioned programs have been tried previously, the creation of sustainable AFV markets has remained a challenge. This webinar will outline how a multiplatform systems dynamics model can be used to explore the dynamics of adopting AFVs in India. In particular, participants will learn about using systems dynamics for:

  • modeling consumer choice;
  • modeling growth in consumer demand; and
  • understanding how the coevolution of auxiliary resources, such as refueling infrastructure, affects adoption of a new technology.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Abhijith Neerkaje was a Tata Fellow while at MIT. Currently a program manager at SanDisk, he has more than six years of experience leading new product introductions at General Electric. He is passionate about frugal engineering design, sustainability, and education.

Currently a Ph.D. student in the MIT Sloan School of Management, SDM alumnus Sergey Naumov has extensive experience in IT, energy, networking, and telecommunications. He has served as head of information technology at a Moscow-based battery manufacturer and R&D director at a startup energy storage company in Germany.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from past presentations can be viewed at http://sdm.mit.edu/voices/webinars.html

Cyber Security and Cyber Defense: A Systems Approach

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesCharles Iheagwara

Charles Iheagwara, Ph.D., Director, Cyber Security Practice, Unatek; SDM Alumnus

Download the presentation slides

Date: August 12, 2013

About the Presentation

Cyber espionage and cyber attacks are just two of the innumerable threats facing enterprise networks as a result of the ever-evolving technical landscape. Reasons include:

  • wireless and cloud domains that have expanded the perimeter of cyber defense;
  • a new underground economy that is not properly understood and which therefore challenges the design, operation, and effectiveness of enterprise cyber security; and
  • the resultant multiplicity of undefined, unforeseen, and often undetected threat vectors.

This webinar will provide:

  • an overview of the extended enterprise landscape and the cyber space ecosystem;
  • a high-level explanation of why current and/or traditional cyber security architecture fails to effectively protect networked institutional and corporate assets; and
  • an introduction to new concepts and ideas that can form the foundation of future cyber security architecture and shields.

About the Speaker

SDM alumnus Dr. Charles Iheagwara is a renowned cyber security expert with more than 13 years of practical field experience; he has also written numerous technical and academic articles on this topic. Dr. Iheagwara has worked with Lockheed Martin, KPMG, NASDAQ (via Edgar Online), and others with crucial security needs, and he has led risk advisory consulting engagements for a wide range of clients, including Reagan National Airport, Dulles International Airport, Metropolitan Airports Authority, Industrial Bank of Washington, and several US government agencies. He holds several graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Glamorgan in the United Kingdom and an S.M. in engineering and management from MIT.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from past presentations can be viewed at http://sdm.mit.edu/voices/webinars.html

Designing and Operating Safety Systems: The Missing Link

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJohn Helferich

SDM Alumnus John Helferich, Former Senior Vice President of R&D, Mars Inc., and Ph.D. Student, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Download the presentation slides

Date: July 29, 2013

About the Presentation

Hospital safety, aviation safety, food safety, product safety and virtually any safety system designed to prevent injury or death, share a critical, often overlooked component: the people who design, operate, and manage them. Recent research shows that they often make mistakes because they are rarely considered part of the system.

This webinar will address why and how to incorporate “safety of management” to minimize errors. It will cover:

  • examples of safety failures and high-level analyses of their origins;
  • a description of the STAMP (Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process) model developed by MIT Professor Nancy Leveson and described in her book, Engineering a Safer World (MIT Press, January 2012);
  • ways that managers can use STAMP’s hazard analysis methods to make safer decisions; and
  • mitigation strategies for unsafe managerial decisions.

Webinar attendees will gain a preliminary understanding of how to apply systems thinking to incorporate STAMP and improve safety, no matter what the industry.

About the Speaker

John Helferich has 28 years of experience with every phase of R&D in the food industry. He has expertise in innovation, technical leadership, fundamental research, intellectual property, quality assurance and food safety, external advisory boards, and product development. He founded and led Mars’ Cocoa Sustainability Programs and is an expert in the strategic assessment and management of technology and innovation in the food industry.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Applying Systems Thinking to World Hunger: Seeking Solutions in Agriculture, Food Production,and Sustainability

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesHank Roark

Hank Roark, Senior Staff Systems Engineer and Researcher,
Deere & Co., and SDM Alumnus

Download the presentation slides

Date: July 15, 2013

About the Presentation

Systems thinking offers possibilities for simultaneously addressing the increasingly urgent and interrelated issues of world hunger and sustainability. This approach can help categorize complex components, such as:

  • global population, which is projected to increase from 7 billion to 9 billion by 2050
  • agricultural production, which will likely need to double—largely in the same land area—to provide enough food, fuel, and fiber for all
  • technological, business, and socio-political challenges that will need to be overcome to sustainably satisfy human needs

This webinar will discuss how to use a systems framework to categorize these components. Sample issues to be explored include:

  • water productivity improvements
  • value chain challenges in sugar production
  • ways to identify the many intersecting engineering systems involved using a socio-technical approach

One goal of the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series is to frame methodologies and ways of thinking about issues that attendees can apply in any domain. In addition, this webinar is designed to spark attendees’ interest in agriculture, food production, and sustainability.

About the Speaker

Hank Roark has almost 20 years’ experience working for large corporations and startups. Most recently, his work and passion have focused on applying systems thinking to address the food needs of the world’s growing population. Previous experience includes leading multinational software product development teams, cofounding two companies, and providing consulting services in global finance, telecommunications, and travel and leisure. He has an S.M. from MIT SDM in engineering and management and a B.S. in physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Using Systems Thinking in a Travel Industry Startup

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesOmer Granot

SDM Alumnus Omer Granot, Cofounder and CEO, Cancelon

Due to the sensitive nature of this topic, the recording and slides will not be available.

Date: June 17, 2013

About the Presentation

More than $10 billion is lost annually by travelers and businesses that have made nonrefundable hotel reservations they cannot use. Presenter Omer Granot cofounded the startup Cancelon to provide a virtual marketplace for travelers wishing to sell and/or buy nonrefundable hotel reservations. Hotels and other travel-related companies can also sell and/or buy unsold or unused reservations through Cancelon; hotels’ listings are free!

Granot will provide a high-level overview of how his team is addressing several technical, business, and socio-political challenges using systems thinking. These include:

  • Projecting market growth and development
  • Continuing to strengthen cybersecurity
  • Managing big data
  • Decreasing response time
  • Securing a new round of financing to take Cancelon to the next level
  • Expanding partnerships with other companies working in online travel and social media
  • Continuing to improve the product, adding features, and enhancing the customer experience

Additional information: www.cancelon.com

About the Speaker

Omer Granot, cofounder and CEO of Cancelon, has extensive experience in IT. As an SDM alumnus, he holds an S.M. in engineering and management from MIT. He also earned a B.Sc. in computer science and mathematics from Ben Gurion University of the Negev.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Trust Frameworks and Asymptotic Identity Proofing: A Systems Approach

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDavid Hartzband

David Hartzband, D.Sc.
Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Download the presentation slides

Date: June 3, 2013

About the Presentation

Any time confidential information is aggregated or stored on the Internet, there is an expectation of data privacy. This expectation may come from end users whose personal, financial, healthcare, and other sensitive information is being gathered (and potentially used), or from intermediate users such as doctors accessing health records, bankers accessing financial information, or from a variety of other sources.

Historically, privacy in such systems has been synonymous with security, and security policies have been defined within the confines of a single application or, at best, within a single closed distributed system. Many current systems use a federated approach to address these problems, but it should come as no surprise that a systems approach based on network principles is more effective at providing both security and privacy.

A White House initiative started in 2011, called the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC), focuses on the provision of trusted identities in a variety of online contexts. The presenter, David Hartzband, D.Sc., is a principal investigator in a NSTIC grant funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The grant, titled “An Identity Ecosystem for Patient-Centered Coordination of Care,” links two health information exchanges with a unique policy-enabled authentication, authorization, and identity proofing system that can gather and utilize identity attributes from disparate sources and use them to provide a very high level of assurance for cyber identities. Hartzband will discuss several use cases from the grant pilot as well as the following topics:

  • The need for trusted identities in healthcare (and elsewhere)
  • The role of identity in online privacy and security
  • The design of the NSTIC healthcare project and pilot
  • The architecture and function of identity syndication
  • A probability model for identity syndication
  • What’s next in the development of trusted identities

About the Speaker

A lecturer in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division, David Hartzband, D.Sc., has spent more than 20 years in software design and development. He joined MIT in 2004 after serving as vice president for collaboration technology at EMC Corporation. He has a wide range of experience at both large and small companies, including Digital Equipment Corporation, Riverton Software, Upstream Consulting, eRoom Technology, and Documentum. Recently, he has worked almost exclusively in healthcare information technology, designing products and working with early-stage companies on business and technology strategy. In the past four years, he has worked on several large federal grants: he is the co-principal investigator for the SCAlable National Network for Effectiveness Research and principal investigator for the NSTIC Identity Ecosystem for Patient-Centered Coordination of Care.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Presentation slides and recordings of previous webinars are available at sdm.mit.edu/voices/webinars.html.

Software Systems Architecture in the World of Cloud Computing

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesChristine Miyachi

Christine Miyachi
Principal Systems Engineer and Architect, Xerox Corporation, and SDM Alumna

Download the presentation slides

Date: May 20, 2013

About the Presentation

Cloud computing is a disruptive technology that is emerging with new opportunities. Companies that move to the cloud can save both time and money.

This webinar will provide:

  • An introduction to several cloud computing basics;
  • A look at various architecture tradeoffs to consider when moving a software system to the cloud, including security, cost, and performance;
  • An overview of architecture principles that can be used in designing software for the cloud.

We invite you to join us.

About the Speaker

SDM alumna Christine Miyachi has almost 30 years of experience working for startups and large corporations. She is the chair of the IEEE Computer Society’s Special Technical Community on Cloud Computing and writes a blog about software architecture. She is a principal systems engineer and architect at Xerox Corporation and holds several patents. Miyachi graduated from the University of Rochester with a BS in electrical engineering. She holds two MIT degrees: an MS in technology and policy/electrical engineering and computer science and an MS in engineering and management.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Presentation slides and recordings of previous webinars are available on demand.

Technical Debt in Large Systems: Understanding the Cost of Software Complexity

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDaniel J. Sturtevant

Daniel J. Sturtevant
Ph.D. MIT and MIT SDM Alumnus

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Date: May 6, 2013

About the Presentation

Many modern systems are so large that no one truly understands how they work. Because these systems exceed the bounds of human understanding, different design teams must work on separate chunks, glue their work together, and hope that the whole thing behaves as expected. In this process, high-level architectural design patterns (such as hierarchies, modules, and abstraction layers) play an important role. By keeping complexity under control, they give systems the ability to scale, make them more able to evolve, and reduce the likelihood of unexpected side effects or integration problems.

Attendees at this webinar will learn about the process and findings of a study in which Dr. Sturtevant:

  • measured architectural complexity across a large commercial software codebase as well as the different costs incurred by the firm that developed and maintained it;
  • estimated the multi-dimensional cost of complexity, which included increased defect density, depressed developer productivity, and increases in morale problems and staff turnover: and,
  • discovered that differences in architectural complexity could account for 50% drops in productivity, three-fold increases in defect density, and order-of-magnitude increases in staff turnover.

In this webinar, engineering leaders and other attendees will learn how they can use the tools and techniques outlined above to better position themselves for managing the technical debt in their large systems. By measuring architectural complexity and linking that information to important cost drivers, firms can better understand the cost associated with architecture problems and estimate the ROI of refactoring efforts aimed at improving a system’s design.

About the Speaker

Dan Sturtevant, Ph.D., is an SDM alumnus and graduate of the MIT Engineering Systems Division doctoral program. His recent work has focused on modeling complex socio-technical systems using network, system dynamics, agent-based, statistical, and other computational techniques.

Dr. Sturtevant is the CEO of Silverthread, Inc., a firm that helps organizations assess business risk, productivity, and complexity in software codebases and development organizations. Prior to cofounding Silverthread (with Professors Carliss Baldwin and Alan MacCormack of Harvard Business School and MIT SDM Senior Lecturer Michael A. M. Davies), Dr. Sturtevant spent many years in the software field where he built Linux-based supercomputers, conducted research and development in cyberwarfare, and helped manage a companywide effort to drive modularity into the source-code for a family of software products. He also cofounded Emtect Solutions, a consulting firm that uses enterprise architecture and system dynamics techniques to address education and workforce issues. Clients have included the Business-Higher Education Forum, the Office of Naval Research, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, the city of Louisville, KY, Edmonds Community College, and the Manufacturing Industrial Council of Washington State.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Flexibility in Engineering Design

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesRichard de Neufville

Richard de Neufville, Ph.D., Dr. h.c.
Professor of Engineering Systems and of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Download the presentation slides

Date: April 22, 2013

About the Presentation

Designed for those concerned with acquiring and implementing new products and systems, such as owners, managers, developers and engineers, this webinar will explain the concept of flexibility in engineering design, using non-technical language and many practical examples.

Professor de Neufville will cover:

  • the problems with predetermined forecasts and requirement sets;
  • the benefits of flexibility in engineering design and its role in developing products that can adapt to a wide range of uncertainties;
  • how flexibility in engineering design delivers value by reducing or eliminating downside risks, increasing access to upside opportunities, and ultimately producing overall win-win solutions and developmental strategies;
  • specific ways successful companies apply flexibility in engineering design, and;
  • a framework and next steps for applying flexibility in engineering design in your organization.

We invite you to join us!

About the Speaker

Richard de Neufville, Ph.D. and Dr. h.c., is a leader in the field of systems planning and design and author of “Flexibility in Engineering Design,” the first book in the new engineering systems series published by MIT Press. He has also published six other texts and currently teaches several MIT courses in this field that are directed generally to engineering systems, with a focus on product design, real estate, urban development, and airport systems design. Prof. de Neufville is currently involved in developing a wide range of flexibility analysis applications, including design of offshore oil platforms, civil engineering infrastructure, automobile plants and parts, and electrical power systems.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Understanding and Designing Complex Sociotechnical Systems

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJoseph M. Sussman

Joseph M. Sussman
JR East Professor in the MIT Engineering Systems Division and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

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Date: April 8, 2013

About the Presentation

While command of technical factors is necessary to understanding “critical contemporary issues” (CCIs), such as climate change, economic growth, mobility, large-scale manufacturing, health, and developing country megacities, more integrated knowledge is needed to address them.

This webinar is designed for engineers, managers, policy makers, health care professionals, educators, students, and others, across industries and disciplines, throughout the world. During this session, MIT’s Joseph M. Sussman, the JR East Professor of MIT’s Engineering Systems Division and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, will:

  • define sociotechnical systems;
  • describe their components and characteristics;
  • discuss how we approach them;
  • describe how design solutions must focus not only on the advanced technologies that characterize contemporary life, but also on their relationship to the organizations and institutions through which they function;
  • discuss examples drawn from various fields.

About the Speaker

A member of the MIT faculty for 45 years, Joseph M. Sussman is the JR East Professor in the Engineering Systems Division and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. He is renowned for his work on transportation issues, including regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP), intelligent transportation systems (ITS), and high-speed rail in the U.S. and abroad. Learn more about Professor Sussman here.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Photo by Barry Hetherington

A Systems-based Approach to Product Design and Development in Patient–centric Health Care

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesAnand Yadav

Anand Yadav
Co-founder and product lead, Neumitra,
and SDM alumnus

Date: CANCELED

About the Presentation

In patient-centric health care, a product is expected to focus on the patients’ immediate needs while delivering clinical value to doctors. Between these competing goals, the product must balance the appeal of a consumer product with the quality of a medical device. A medical device must comply with strict regulatory requirements, undergoes fewer iterations, and costs more, while a consumer product undergoes many iterations to deliver better user experience and aesthetics at an affordable cost. Yadav will discuss Neumitra’s balanced approach developed during the design of bandu — a wearable biosensor and supporting analytical software. Neumitra aims to advance brain health and performance for daily life.

About the Speaker

Anand Yadav is a product lead at Neumitra, which he co-founded in 2010 as an SDM fellow at MIT. He previously worked at The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT where he developed process improvement solutions for high-throughput genome sequencing. Yadav was a member of the team that developed a large-scale automated system for the Human Genome Project at the Whitehead Institute. He holds a M.S. in engineering and management from MIT, an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Tufts University and a B.E. in Mechanical Engineering from Punjab Engineering College, India.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Crises In Employment, Consumption, Economic Growth, and the Environment: Could a Shorter Workweek and a Greener Economy Provide Relief?

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesNicholas A. Ashford, PhD

Nicholas A. Ashford, PhD., JD
Professor of Technology and Policy, MIT; Director, MIT Technology and Law Program

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Date: March 11, 2013

About the Presentation

The crises we encounter today could be described as a ‘perfect storm.’ The global financial crisis that began in 2008 has left many people with too little money and/or willingness to spend. This results in too few goods and services being produced and too little being purchased. This in turn exacerbates unemployment and underemployment. As a result, a vicious circle is created in which less money is spent in consumption and in investment in subsequent and repeated cycles, further worsening the crisis in consumption. On the other hand, some people and economic actors consume too much from an energy and resource perspective, exacerbating environmental problems. Two solutions are frequently suggested to the present crises: spread work out through a shorter workweek and green the economy. An analysis of the likelihood of success of each is the focus of this presentation. Insights from a recent book: Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development: Transforming the Industrial State (2011, Yale University Press) will inform the presentation.

About the Speaker

Nicholas Ashford holds both a Ph.D. in Chemistry and a law degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in economics. His courses, jointly listed with ESD/Engineering, the Sloan School, and Urban Studies, draw students from across the Institute and he has supervised graduate theses in the TPP, SDM, and ESD programs. In addition to his recent book, he has co-authored Environmental Law, Policy and Economics: Reclaiming the Environmental Agenda and has published six additional books and several hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Leadership for Learning Organizations: Lessons from healthcare, sports, and more to help you obtain better results

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesPaul F. Levy

Paul F. Levy, Author

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Date: February 25, 2013

About the Presentation

The world is rife with process improvement methods designed to deal with systemic issues facing manufacturing and services firms. Although proven tools, such as Six Sigma, Re-engineering, and Lean, exist to build learning organizations with enhanced efficiency and deliver higher quality products to customers, most organizations never achieve these goals. Why do so many work redesign efforts fail?

Paul Levy offers answers in a story-laden presentation based on his experience in several important leadership roles. These include serving as CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and executive director of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. Levy’s presentation will also draw from his work in coaching girls’ soccer over two decades. His recently published book, “Goal Play! Leadership Lessons from the Soccer Field”, draws on experiences gleaned from both parts of his life. Whether you are a CEO, department head, division manager, a professional who wants to work with others to improve the systems in your organization, or a volunteer in your community, this presentation offers insights to help you provide value wherever you are.

About the Speaker

Paul F. Levy served most recently as CEO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, where he saved this Harvard-affiliated academic medical center from financial turmoil that was leading to bankruptcy. Later, he introduced unprecedented levels of transparency into the health care field, resulting in substantial improvements in patient quality and safety, while enhancing financial results and market share. Previously, as executive director of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, he led the program to clean up Boston Harbor, executing a massive environmental remediation project ahead of schedule and under budget. He is the author of the recently published book, “Goal Play! Leadership Lessons from the Soccer Field”.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

From Politics and Finance to Power Grids and Products: Addressing Complexity in the Interconnected World

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDan Braha

Dan Braha, PhD
Visiting Professor, MIT Engineering Systems Division

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Date: February 11, 2013

About the Presentation

How can we manage the financial crisis? How do civil unrest, religion, and rumors spread, and how is that related to epidemics and earthquakes? Can human behavior and societal systems be studied in the same way as biological systems and complex man-made systems?

In this webinar and post-event recording, Dr. Dan Braha will demonstrate how the field of complexity research provides clues to these intriguing questions. He will focus on why and how complex socio-economic systems evolve and why these large scale engineering systems fail and offer guidelines that can be applied across industries and organizations around the world.

About the Speaker

Dan Braha, PhD, has contributed to a wide spectrum of research areas. In particular, he has advanced the area of complex systems by introducing novel methodologies for understanding the functionality, dynamics, robustness, and fragility of large-scale socio-engineered, economic, political, and managerial systems. These systems—like power grids, large-scale projects, financial systems, or societal systems—are so ubiquitous in our daily lives that we usually take them for granted, only noticing them when they break down. He is interested in questions such as: How do such amazing technologies, infrastructures, and organizations come to be what they are? How are these systems designed? How do distributed networks work, and why does information in social networks diffuse in a very fast and effective way? How are they made to be robust and respond rapidly to errors? To address these questions, he explores the interplay between biological, physical, and large-scale human-made systems by creating data-driven theoretical and computational models using the tools of statistical physics, sociology, operations research, and computer science.

Dr. Braha is currently a visiting professor at the MIT Engineering Systems Division (ESD). He is a co-faculty of the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI), where he conducts research and teaches courses in complex systems, and he is also a full professor at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. Prior to that, he was a visiting professor at MIT, a research scientist at Boston University, and a tenured professor in Israel. Dr. Braha has published in various prestigious journals, and edited or authored seven books, including Complex Engineered Systems (with Springer). His work was covered by various national and international news media including The Economist, WIRED, Le Monde, The Huffington Post, and New Scientist. He serves as editor of the Complexity Series at Springer, the area editor of Systems for Research in Engineering Design, and as editorial board member of various other leading journals. He has served on executive committees and as chair at a number of international conferences including the International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS). Dr. Braha is regularly invited to consult with and present his work in international organizations and conferences.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Applying a Complex System Architecture Evaluation Method to the 2005 Ford GT 200 MPH Supercar

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesScott Ahlman

Scott Ahlman, MIT SDM Alumnus
President, Ahlman Engineering, Inc.

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Date: January 28, 2013

About the Presentation

Through painful experience, many companies have learned that they cannot develop a way out of an architecture issue that is uncovered late in the product development process, such as in the verification (hardware and tooling) stage. If a company gets the architecture right at the front end, it can achieve a huge competitive advantage over the short and long term. If it gets the architecture wrong, the results can be costly. Therefore, a rigorous approach to system architecture at the front end of system design is essential. No longer can a chief engineer rely primarily on experience-based intuition rather than a rigorous process and methods.

This webinar presents a hierarchical synthesis of known qualitative and quantitative architecting tools and methods and explains how it was applied to the powertrain system of the 2005 Ford GT Supercar. It will demonstrate how the powertrain architecture decision was critical to achieving the system goals within previously unmatched timing and resource constraints and discuss their impact on final results. This approach can be applied across industries and products.

About the Speaker

Scott Ahlman has 19 years experience in automotive product development and performance engineering.

Ahlman spent 12 years at Ford Motor Company as an engineer in chassis design, vehicle dynamics and systems. His experience there included light truck passenger car work followed by a short stint with NASCAR Craftsman Trucks, and six years in the open wheel CART ChampCar racing series for Ford Racing with Team Rahal. The highlight of his career included chassis design, vehicle dynamics and system engineering/architecture/optimization on the 2005 Ford GT 200 MPH Supercar from start to finish.

In 2006, Ahlman left Ford to start his own company, Ahlman Engineering, which initially focused on racing and provided chassis/vehicle dynamics engineering support in the Indy Racing League for Rahal Letterman Racing. Over the last 6 years, he has led the Roush-Fenway Racing NASCAR Sprint Cup chassis/vehicle dynamics and systems engineering/optimization through an independent contract with Ford Racing. In this role, Scott has made significant contributions to 29 NASCAR Sprint Cup wins, including two second place finishes in the championship and winner of the 2007 “Jack” Roush MVP Award. Ahlman Engineering now provides beginning-to-end automotive-focused product development services.

As an MIT SDM alumnus, Ahlman holds an MS in Engineering and Management with a system architecture emphasis. He also earned a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Buying Common: Executing Platform Strategies in Supply Chain and Procurement Organizations

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesBruce Cameron

Bruce Cameron, PhD
Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division

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Date: January 14, 2013

About the Presentation

Companies pursuing platform strategies focus heavily on market strategy and product development, often leaving procurement and supply chain decisions to downstream supporting business units. Supply chain organizations are faced with heavy investments in process complexity to manage common parts, but do not necessarily internalize the system-wide benefits of sharing parts. This webinar will explore the contract levers available to firms to incentivize commonality in their supply chains, and will discuss best practices for incorporating feedback into product development decisions.

About the Speaker

Bruce Cameron, PhD, is a lecturer in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division and a consultant on platform strategies. At MIT, he ran the MIT Commonality Study, a 16-firm investigation of platforming returns. His current clients include Fortune 500 firms in high-tech, aerospace, transportation, and consumer goods.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Lean Thinking in an Academic Medical Center — The Beat Goes On

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDr. John E. Billi

Dr. John E. Billi, Professor of Internal Medicine and Medical Education,
University of Michigan Medical School and Associate Vice President, Medical Affairs, University of Michigan

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About the Presentation

The University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) has been on the lean journey for the past seven years, creating the Michigan Quality System. UMHS has over 20,000 faculty, staff, and trainees. The goal is to create 20,000 problem solvers who are finding and fixing root causes of problems they face daily. This webinar will briefly recap UMHS’ initial approach, results of early experiments, what leaders learned, and how UMHS adjusted. The webinar will cover their current set of experiments, including the transition from scattered projects led by coaches to an integrated approach that incorporates People Development into Process Improvement.

About the Speaker

Dr. Billi’s research and management interests are in the field of health services delivery, including use of lean thinking to improve quality and efficiency, use of evidence-based guidelines, population health, clinical practice transformation tied to performance-based differential reimbursement, and conflict of interest management. He leads the Michigan Quality System, which is the University of Michigan Health System’s business strategy to transform clinical, academic and administrative functions through development and deployment of a uniform quality improvement philosophy.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Multisourcing Conflicts: What Does a Manager Focus On?

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesNirmalya Banerjee

Nirmalya Banerjee, SDM ’11
Development Manager, Open Access Technologies International Inc.

Date: November 19, 2012

About the Presentation

Multisourcing has its own set of challenges. With more people from different organizations on board, conflicts are bound to arise. The complex nature of these conflicts calls for specialized resolution strategies, which means more effort for the client managers.

This webinar attempts to showcase the use of system dynamics as a tool to facilitate conflict mitigation. The study is based on the case of a company from the information technology industry using multisourcing. A brief overview of the shift from outsourcing to multisourcing and the challenges faced is presented to understand the evolution and context. Thereafter interview based exploratory methods and system dynamics based analytical methods are used to prioritize the challenges, gauge the effectiveness of the conflict resolution strategies used by managers and make recommendation based on the system dynamics model. Managers can modify the model as per their respective setup in order to prioritize what conflicts need the most attention and the efficacy of their resolution strategies.

About the Speaker

Nirmalya Banerjee, SDM ’11, works for Open Access Technology International (OATI), an energy software company located in Minneapolis. There, as a development manager, he applies systems thinking to create software solutions for emerging fields like smart grids and energy trading.

Prior to matriculating at SDM, Banerjee worked at Apple Singapore as a project manager where he led a team of 32 consultants who supported the SAP system. Banerjee focused on developing innovative process changes to tackle global challenges. An Indian national scholar in mathematics, Banerjee began his career as an electrical engineer and received further education with an MBA in marketing.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Strategies for Evolution and Sustenance of Network Ecosystem

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesSaujanya Shrivastava

Saujanya Shrivastava, SDM ’11
Senior Product Manager, Amazon

Download the presentation slides

Date: October 15, 2012

About the Presentation

Managing a network platform business can be a complex proposition for the platform owner due to various intricacies that are associated with it. These platforms have distinct users, each having exclusive needs and requirements. Also, success of one side is closely interlinked to the success of the other.

This webinar attempts to implode various aspects of network platforms, helps to develop the understanding of the core concepts and develops key strategies for success of such platforms. It also shows that strategies involved in managing successful network platforms are different from those involved in managing legacy products, and only those companies that are able to understand these key differences are able to successfully create a vibrant ecosystem around the platform.

About the Speaker

Saujanya Shrivastava, technology enthusiast and SDM’11 alumnus, currently works as a senior product manager at Amazon, based out of Seattle. At Amazon, he is involved in bridging the gap between business needs and technology innovation, helping Amazon to provide the highest level of customer experience at an optimal cost.

While Saujanya completed his master’s degree in Engineering and Management in the SDM Program, he worked as a strategy consultant in the MIT Center of Digital Business, where he consulted SAP on its next generation platform strategy based on on-demand cloud services. Prior to MIT, he worked in telecom industry for nine years in Europe and Asia and earned an MS in Software Engineering from University of Oxford, UK.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Managing for Profit: Five Building Blocks of Success

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJonathan Byrnes

Jonathan Byrnes
Senior Lecturer, MIT

Download the presentation slides

Date: October 1, 2012

About the Presentation

In this webinar, MIT Senior Lecturer Jonathan Byrnes explains the five building blocks of success in profitability management: (1) organizing for success; (2) leading paradigmatic change; (3) developing a great middle management team; (4) creating major change in a customer or supplier; and (5) becoming a great leader. The webinar contains a number of case examples.

About the Speaker

Jonathan Byrnes is Senior Lecturer at MIT, where he has taught at the graduate level and in executive programs for nearly twenty years. He has authored over two hundred books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions, including Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink, which Inc.com named to its 2010 list of Best Books for Business Owners.

He is President of Jonathan Byrnes & Co., a focused consulting company which has advised over fifty major companies, hospitals, and industry associations since 1976. Dr. Byrnes has led a number of projects that have produced high value and lasting innovations, including direct development of vendor managed inventory, pipeline inventory systems, and profit mapping.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Incumbent’s Dilemma: To fight, follow or flee the attacking innovation?

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDr. Chintan Vaishnav

Dr. Chintan Vaishnav, Postdoctoral Researcher at MITSergey Naumov
and Sergey Naumov, SDM ’11

Date: September 17, 2012

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About the Presentation

Why do some new technologies become dominant while others fail or coexist with the old? We explore this question by first developing model-driven theory using a comprehensive system dynamics model of technology and industry disruption. Our research uncovers firm-, product-, and environment-level drivers responsible for the success or failure of a new technology and a firm. We then use appropriate case studies to show why in some situations incumbents retain market share, while in others new entrants drive them out.

About the Speakers

Dr. Chintan Vaishnav
Chintan Vaishnav is a postdoctoral researcher across MIT’s Sloan School of Management, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and Department of Political Science. His research and action broadly focuses on two existing challenges: understanding the implications of rapidly changing technology for public policy and managerial decisions; and utilizing technology to effectively solve the problems stemming from gross socio-economic inequities. Chintan holds a PhD in Technology, Management and Policy from MIT’s Engineering Systems Division, and has several years of engineering research experience at the Bell Labs.

Sergey Naumov
Sergey Naumov is a System Design and Management Fellow. His current research focuses on understanding dynamics of the diffusion of innovations in rapidly changing environment of customer preferences. Sergey received an MS in Mechanical Engineering, cum laude, and was previously Head of Information Technology at a Moscow-based battery manufacturer and R&D Director at a start-up energy storage company in Germany, working on corporate IT strategy and network and security issues.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Identifying Architectural Modularity in the Smart Grid

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesBrad Rogers

Brad Rogers
Navigant

Date: August 20, 2012

Download the presentation slides
Full paper available here.

About the Presentation

One significant challenge facing a broader deployment of modern grid technologies is integrating with legacy systems while driving toward elegant, interoperable solutions in future grid integration efforts. This challenge is compounded by the de facto approach of customizing point-to-point integration solutions, resulting in an “accidental architecture” of the existing grid.

The Design Structure Matrix methodology is applied to two publically available architecture models to demonstrate how this approach can help define smart grid architectures and to help identify architectural groupings that can lead tobetter modularization of smart grid systems and standardization efforts. The analysis concludes that initial smart grid architectural efforts can be improved upon by identifying areas of modularity and organizing around them.

About the Speaker

Brad Rogers is a Managing Consultant in the Energy Practice in Navigant’s Boulder, Colorado office. Brad’s work at Navigant has encompassed grid modernization efforts including developing smart grid business cases for specific advanced meter investment decisions and regional deployment strategies, designing metric tracking systems for smart grid demonstration projects, recommending tailored approaches for developing grid interoperability standards, popularizing an approach that produces more modularized intelligent grid architectures, andstatistically evaluating the accuracy of deployed smart meters with sophisticated econometric methods.

Before working at Navigant, Brad worked for Summit Blue Consulting, Spirit AeroSystems, Nuvera Fuel Cells, and the United States Peace Corps. Brad earned an M.B.A. and an M.S. in Engineering Systems with a concentration in Energy and Sustainability at MIT in the Leaders for Global Operations program. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, summa cum laude, with a minor in BusinessEngineering Technology from Auburn University.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Using Systems Engineering Tools to Design a Smart Energy Box

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJonathan Hickey

Jonathan Hickey

Date: July 23, 2012

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About the Presentation

A network that distributes power generated by Renewable Energy Supplies (RESs) will require a “smart box” in each home in the network to meter power and to connect to and communicate with other elements of the network. These smart boxes will also have to function as control devices to ensure safe and reliable operation of the grid. Use of systems engineering tools such as stakeholder analysis and axiomatic design and STAMP (Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Processes) was effective for development of initial customer attributes and associated functional requirements, design parameters, and process variables, respectively. Inclusion of system-level safety analysis such as STPA in conjunction with the aforementioned systems engineering tools in the conceptual design phase is highly effective in capturing key functional requirements early in the design and development of complex socio-technical systems.

About the Speaker

Jonathan Hickey is a Commander in the United States Coast Guard (USCG). He holds a bachelors degree in civil engineering from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, a masters in civil engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, a masters in project management from George Washington University, and recently completed his masters in engineering and management from MIT’s System Design and Management Program.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Transformation of the Datacenter: How to Solve the Exascale Problem with This One Weird Trick Discovered by a Housewife in Cambridge

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesKurt Keville

Kurt Keville, SDM ’09
Research Specialist, MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

Date: June 11, 2012

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About the Presentation

This webinar will offer a comprehensive overview on the primary issues facing the modern datacenter in the drive to become higher performing and less costly, and methods to address those issues. This presentation will examine the immediate and long-term goals of the primary stakeholders in the supercomputing community, including government, academia, and industry, all three of which have an increasing footprint in the High-Performance Computing (HPC) business.

Subsequent to a discussion of the variables available to supercomputer and datacenter system designers will be an overview of the state-of-the-art, and how industry, primarily through the work of Facebook and Google, has transformed the datacenter archetype.

About the Speaker

Kurt Keville, SDM ’09, maintains the HPC at the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies and constructs purpose-built clusters for the applications and codes that are utilized by the researchers there. He is an embedded HPC developer and designer and is conversant in the issues that pertain to optimization of embedded systems. Keville holds a SM degree (SDM) from the Engineering System Division at MIT and a BS from West Point.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Approach to Prevent Safety and Quality Problems in Modern Automobiles

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesQi Van Eikema Hommes, PhD

Qi Van Eikema Hommes, PhD
Research Associate and Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Date: May 14, 2012

Download the presentation slides

About the Presentation

Today’s automobiles are characterized by complex Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), where numerous embedded devices are networked to control physical hardware components. These systems are software intensive, and typically developed by globally distributed large multidisciplinary teams. Many such systems already experienced quality and safety problems that could not be traced back to component failures. One such example is the recent Toyota Unintended Acceleration case.

In this webinar, Dr. Hommes will address the recently published ISO 26262 Functional Safety for Road Vehicle, the industry’s first attempt at providing safety assurance for the complex automotive electronic systems. It is a positive first step, and a number of areas can be improved by taking on a more systems approach. A system theoretic hazard analysis method, developed by Professor Leveson at MIT, is applied to the Adaptive Cruise Control system design, illustrating one of the directions to improve the safety and quality of future automobiles.

About the Speaker

Dr. Van Eikema Hommes is a research associate and lecturer with the Engineering Systems Division at MIT. Her research focuses on the interactive complexity in large engineering systems and products. She also teaches Systems Engineering and Product Development at MIT.

Dr. Hommes is currently on the technical staff of Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, providing expert advice to NHTSA on the safety regulation of automotive electronic systems. In addition, she has industry experience with Ford Motor Company and General Motors.

Dr. Van Eikema Hommes holds a SM degree and a PhD degree from the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. She is a certified Six Sigma Blackbelt. She has published a number of papers in the ASME DETC DTM conference, SAE, and INCOSE conference. She also has several internal technical publications both at Ford and GM.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Emergence of a Digital Money Ecosystem

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesIrving Wladawsky-Berger

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, PhD
Visiting Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division and
MIT Sloan School of Management

Date: April 30, 2012

About the Presentation

We are in the early stages of a very important transformation—the transition to a digital money ecosystem. This transformation is likely to be among the most exciting, important, and challenging initiatives the world will undertake in the coming decades.

The transformation involves more than the transformation of money (cash, checks, credit and debit cards, etc.) from physical to digital objects that we will carry in our smart mobile devices. It encompasses the whole money ecosystem, including the global payment infrastructures, the management of personal identities and personal financial data, the global financial flows among institutions and between institutions and individuals, the government regulatory regimes, and more.

This webinar will present an overview of this digital money transformation and the technical and societal forces that are driving it. We will also discuss some of the potential major consequences to business, the economy, and society in general.

For more information on this topic, please see Dr. Wladawsky-Berger’s blog entry.

About the Speaker

Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger worked at IBM for 37 years, where his primary focus was on innovation and technical strategy. He then joined Citi as Strategic Advisor working on innovation and technology initiatives including the transition to mobile digital money and payments. He is Visiting Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and Engineering Systems Division, Adjunct Professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School, and Senior Fellow at the Levin Institute of the State University of New York.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, PhD

How Self-Organizing "Tribes" are Transforming the Solar Industry

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesDonny Holaschutz

Donny Holaschutz, SDM ’10
Co-founder and CEO, Bloomgi

Date: April 2, 2012

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About the Presentation

This webinar will offer an interdisciplinary perspective on solar innovation in the United States by examining over 100 case studies. It will use these research findings to describe how self-organizing groups, or “tribes,” have become a driving force in transforming the solar innovation industry nationally and globally, and also focus on their potential to transform the value network.

The webinar will highlight various characteristics of successful tribes. Factors such as dynamics leading to formation, patterns of growth, evolution, and, in some cases, demise will be examined as well. The presentation will also describe the place and relationship of the ideal entity within existing and future solar innovation clusters.

The current status of the United States’ competitive advantage will be discussed by comparing emerging and established regional solar innovation capabilities. A framework will be offered to provide government and industry decision-makers with an approach that can be implemented immediately to build a global competitive advantage.

This research was funded by the US Department of Energy.

About the Speaker

Donny Holaschutz, SDM ’10, is a clean technology and sustainability entrepreneur based out of Austin, Texas. He is a co-founder and the CEO of Bloomgi, a startup focused on creating innovative, sustainable, and environmentally-friendly product alternatives that offer consumers the choice to improve the health of our planet without sacrificing convenience.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

A Systems Approach for Addressing the Crisis in Employment and Consumer Demand

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesNicholas A. Ashford, PhD

Nicholas A. Ashford, PhD., JD
Professor of Technology and Policy
Director, MIT Technology and Law Program

Date: March 19, 2012

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About the Presentation

A sustainable industrial system depends not only on good environmental and public health outcomes, but also on sustainable employment and earning capacity. These concerns are likely to dominate future national political debates, requiring changes in the nature of work and employment, and in the ownership of productive capital. Making the economy greener, while certainly necessary for long-term economic and societal survival, does not necessarily mean more and better paying jobs on a large enough scale to make serious progress to reducing unemployment and underemployment.

At present, national and global reforms are focused on improving the financial system, which is not synonymous with reforming the economic system or improving the economic status of individual citizens. The session discusses the root causes of the crisis and offers specific policies and initiatives that need to be considered to ensure sustainable employment and livelihoods in the context of a well-functioning and equitable economic system.

About the Speaker

Professor Nicholas A. Ashford teaches courses in Environmental Law, Policy, & Economics; Law, Technology, & Public Policy; and Sustainability, Trade & Environment. Ashford is a faculty associate of the Center for Technology, Policy, and Industrial Development in the School of Engineering; the Institute for Work and Employment Research in the Sloan School of Management; and the Environmental Policy Group in the Urban Studies Department. He holds both a PhD in chemistry and a law degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in economics. Ashford’s courses, jointly listed with ESD/Engineering, the Sloan School, and Urban Studies, draw students from all over the Institute. He has supervised graduate theses in the TPP, ESD, and SDM programs.

Ashford is the co-author of two recent textbooks/readers: Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development: Transforming the Industrial State (2011, Yale University Press) and Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Reclaiming the Environmental Agenda (2008, MIT Press). He has published five additional books and several hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews.

Ashford was a public member and chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety & Health, served on the EPA Science Advisory Board, and was chairman of the Committee on Technology Innovation & Economics of the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology. Ashford is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and former chair of its Section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering. He served as an advisor to the United Nations Environment Programme and currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Cleaner Production; the Journal of Environmental Technology and Management; the Journal of Environmental Policy and Governance; and Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Investigations of Platform Savings Reveal Systemic Management Challenges

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesBruce Cameron, PhD

Bruce Cameron, PhD
Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Date: March 5, 2012

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About the Presentation

Companies from aerospace to white goods use platforming strategies to deliver more variety to their customers while saving internally by sharing parts and overhead. However, many firms fail to earn a return on their investment in platforms—Black & Decker famously dropped its platforming strategy one generation after a landmark tool family design. This webinar will explore whether such failures are the result of flawed strategy or execution challenges.

The challenges will be discussed in the context of industrial case studies conducted over the last six years. These studies have shown that many firms face systematic downward pressure on commonality. For example, in several cases companies set initial commonality goals only to realize less than half of the commonality expected. Using a systems thinking framework of platforms, it can be shown that this divergence in commonality resulted in noticeable erosion of commonality benefits. Notably, the lead variants that bore the platform costs achieved weak investment returns and recaptured few benefits from later variants. The key management methods used in successful product families will be reviewed, along with descriptions of how they helped firms achieve competitive advantages.

About the Speaker:

Bruce Cameron, PhD, is a lecturer in MIT’s Engineering Systems Division and a consultant on platform strategies. At MIT, he ran the MIT Commonality Study, a 16-firm investigation of platforming returns. His current clients include Fortune 500 firms in high-tech, aerospace, transportation, and consumer goods. Prior to MIT, he worked as an engagement manager at a management consultancy and as a system engineer at MDA Space Systems; hardware he built is currently in orbit. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Toronto and graduate degrees from MIT.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

How Software Learns: What Happens after Software Is Shipped

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesChristine Miyachi

Christine Miyachi
SDM Alumnus and Principal Systems Engineer and Architect, Xerox Corporation

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Date: February 6, 2012

About the Presentation

Software architecture has sometimes been compared to building architecture, but that comparison has also been faulted as inaccurate because software has a capacity for adaptive change, while buildings are permanent. Or, at least they appear to be. In fact, buildings are complex systems that change drastically over time—as noted in Stewart Brand’s book, How Buildings Learn. Software engineers have a lot to learn from architecture, and building designers can learn a lot from modern software systems. This webinar will examine the aspects of both systems that change—slowly and quickly—with a focus on two system properties in particular: maintainability and extensibility. Can we construct both buildings and software systems with a high degree of maintainability and extensibility? Modern agile software processes produce systems that may be missing these two key properties, and buildings have ignored them for years. This webinar will reveal how software systems can learn and evolve just as buildings do.

About the Speaker:

SDM alumna Christine Miyachi has over 25 years of experience working for startups and large corporations. She writes a weekly blog about software architecture: http://abstractsoftware.blogspot.com/. She is currently a principal systems engineer and architect at Xerox Corporation and holds several patents. Miyachi graduated from the University of Rochester with a BS in electrical engineering. She holds two MIT degrees: an MS in technology and policy/electrical engineering and computer science and an MS in engineering and management.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Inventory Productivity: Missing Link Between Supply Chain Management and Sales

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJonathan L.S. Byrnes

Jonathan L.S. Byrnes
Senior Lecturer, MIT

Date: January 23, 2012

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About the Presentation

Traditionally, supply chain and sales have been managed relatively independently, despite the critical impact that each has on the other. Systems thinking provides the key to linking these two critical business functions.

Inventory productivity, the return on invested capital in your inventory, is the single systems measure that links these two cornerstone functions. This webinar will: 1) explain the central importance of this critical metric; 2) describe how to measure inventory productivity in a practical way; 3) outline the levers that both sales and supply chain managers can use to radically improve inventory productivity; and 4) describe how leading companies have created core processes for sales and supply chain managers to work together to achieve stunning results.

About the Speaker:

Jonathan L.S. Byrnes, senior lecturer at MIT, is an acknowledged authority on supply chain management, account management, and profitability management. His extensive experience spans virtually every industry, including healthcare, transportation, software, retail, financial services, distribution, and others.

At MIT, Dr. Byrnes has taught at the graduate level and in executive programs for 20 years. He has authored over 100 books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions. In addition, he wrote a monthly column on managing profitability for Harvard Business School’s Working Knowledge for four years, and recently authored Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink, which Inc.com named to its list of Best Business Books of 2010.

He also is president of Jonathan Byrnes & Co., a consulting company founded in 1976. In that role he has advised over 50 major companies, medical institutions, and industry associations. Dr. Byrnes serves on the board of directors of MSC Industrial Direct, Inc. (a New York Stock Exchange company) and has served on the advisory boards of Objectiva Software and Autopart International. He currently serves on the advisory boards of RMG Networks, OCO, and WaveMark, all development-stage companies. Dr. Byrnes earned a DBA from Harvard University in 1980.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Creative Experimentation: Developing a Skill Critical for Managing Complex Operating Systems (A two-part series)

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesSteven J. Spear

Steven J. Spear
Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management; Senior Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division; Senior Fellow, Institute for Healthcare Improvement; and author, The High Velocity Edge

Part-one

Part-two

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Date: January 9, 2012 and January 30, 2012

About the Presentation

A broad-based capacity for experimentation is critical for organizations to succeed because the systems in which people are embedded are increasingly complex and fast. For instance, medical treatment used to be accomplished by “going to the doctor,” a sole practitioner supported by a handful of other professionals, who mastered a body of scientific knowledge through steady practice. Now, thanks to the tremendous advances in medical science and technology, diagnosis and treatment span myriad disciplines and countless professionals. Doctors have to be masters in their own fields and masters in coordinating care delivery tailored to individual patients’ needs. Experience can no longer be steadily accumulated over time. Rather, teams must experiment off-line so they are prepared for the variety of situations they’ll face in real time. The same challenge of having to build knowledge in particular disciplines and learn quickly how to pull the pieces together into coherent efforts is characteristic of manufacturing design and production, services, information technology, and more.

Steven J. Spear’s webinar will illustrate this migration from simple and stable to complex and fast, with examples of how organizations have learned to succeed by cultivating a capacity for high-speed, broad-based experimentation. A question and answer session will allow listeners to speculate about what would be involved in developing such a capability in their own organizations.

About the Speaker:

Operational excellence and innovation expert Steven J. Spear is a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management, a senior lecturer in the MIT Engineering Systems Division, and a senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. His book, The High Velocity Edge, has won numerous awards, including the Philip Crosby Medal from the American Society for Quality in 2011.

Spear is an internationally recognized expert in leadership, innovation, and operational excellence, and he is an authority on how select companies in high-tech and heavy industry, design and production, manufacturing and services generate unmatchable performance by converting improvement and innovation from the rare kiss of inspiration to repeatable, broad-based, skill-based disciplines.

Spear’s research has been exceptionally well acknowledged with five Shingo Prizes and a McKinsey award from Harvard Business Review. Spear’s “Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System” and “Learning to Lead at Toyota,” are part of the lean manufacturing canon. His “Fixing Healthcare from the Inside, Today” and articles in Annals of Internal Medicine and Academic Medicine have been on the forefront in healthcare improvement. He has contributed to the Boston Globe and New York Times, has appeared on Bloomberg TV and radio, CBS, and elsewhere. His clients have included well-known corporations like Intel, Lockheed Martin, Intuit, Novelis, Alcoa, General Electric, Memorial Sloan Kettering, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Among other accomplishments, Spear helped the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative create its Perfecting Patient Care System. That has been credited with eliminating horrible complications like central line infections and thereby improving care quality while reducing costs. The Alcoa Business System, which he helped design and launch, is regularly credited with hundreds of millions of dollars in annual savings. Other clients have dramatically compressed time and costs for marketing processes, new product development, and software design.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Using Lean Thinking to Transform a Large Academic Medical Center

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJohn E. Billi, MD

John E. Billi, MD
Professor of Internal Medicine and Medical Education and
Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, University of Michigan Medical School
Associate Vice President for Medical Affairs, University of Michigan

Date: December 12, 2011

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About the Presentation

Lean thinking is a business system that empowers frontline workers to find and fix the root causes of problems they face daily using the scientific method of problem solving. This philosophy has been applied successfully in many industries, ranging from manufacturing to service. In the past decade, many hospitals and other healthcare entities have begun to use lean thinking to improve operational performance.

Although some healthcare entities use only selected aspects of lean thinking for specific types of problems, many believe lean thinking works best when implemented as a holistic system. These organizations strive to use the principles of lean thinking as their overarching business strategy to achieve operational excellence—doing the right things and doing them the right way. This requires a management philosophy that cascades responsibility, in which workers and managers focus on value in the eyes of the customer and “pull” the authority they need to solve problems.

The University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) has been on the lean journey for the past six years, creating the Michigan Quality System. UMHS has 20,000 faculty, staff, and trainees. The goal is to create 20,000 problem solvers who are finding and fixing root causes of problems they face daily. This webinar will describe UMHS’ initial approach, results of early experiments, what leaders learned, and how they adjusted. Discussion will include the transition from scattered projects led by coaches to an integrated approach that incorporates people development and process improvement.

About the Speaker:

Dr. John E. Billi serves as associate dean for clinical affairs at the University of Michigan Medical School and as associate vice president for medical affairs at the University of Michigan. He leads the Michigan Quality System, the University of Michigan Health System’s business strategy to transform clinical, academic, and administrative functions through development and deployment of a uniform quality improvement philosophy. He also practices as a general internist in a primary care clinic at the University of Michigan. Active in several initiatives affecting quality of care and practice issues, he chairs the Michigan State Medical Society’s Committee on Health Care Quality, Efficiency, and Economics and co-chairs the Michigan Quality Improvement Consortium Medical Director’s Committee, which endorses evidence-based practice guidelines across 16 health plans.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Start-Up Thinking: How Systems Thinking Helps Entrepreneurial Ventures Start, Grow, and Mature

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesSorin Grama and Sam White

Sorin Grama, Founder and CEO, Promethean Power Systems; SDM Alumnus
Sam White, Founder and Vice President for Business Development, Promethean Power Systems

Date: November 28, 2011

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About the Presentation

Soon after a business plan is hatched and long before manufacturing ramps up, start-ups begin to apply systems design principles to create their breakthrough products. It turns out that systems engineering, an art developed and perfected in large organizations, applies just as well to small entrepreneurial ventures. What can start-ups learn from the likes of Ford and Boeing? Sorin Grama and Sam White, who launched Promethean Power Systems just after Grama graduated from SDM, will discuss how systems thinking shaped their start-up journey and helped them address social challenges while developing their first product.

About the Speakers

Sorin Grama, SDM ’06, is the co-founder and CEO of Promethean Power Systems. He previously worked for National Instruments. He has a BS in electrical engineering from Ohio State University and an MS in engineering and management from MIT.

Sam White is the co-founder of Promethean Power, where he lines up partners, customers, and funding. His experience in business development includes five years with the Institute of Management Resources in Madrid. He has a BA from Union College and recently graduated from the Global Social Benefit Incubator at Santa Clara University.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Power System Balancing with High Renewable Penetration: The Potential of Demand Response in Hawai’i

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesKarl Critz

Karl Critz, SDM ’10, Clean Energy Innovator and SDM Student

Date: November 14, 2011

About the Presentation

The state of Hawai’i plans to obtain 40% of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030. Balancing intermittent wind with fossil fuel plants can be expensive, slowing adoption. A social and technical infrastructure for temporary reductions in load (demand response) enables 4% greater wind harvesting at 10% less operating cost. This webinar will focus on an investigation that applied a stochastic unit commitment optimization to account for uncertain wind forecasts. Fast-responding demand enabled existing thermal generators to run more efficiently, increased the grid’s reliability margins, and infrequently impacted customers. The demand response modeled here could put Hawai’i on a pragmatic path to achieving its energy independence goals and will provide lessons for renewable energy integration on the mainland.

About the Speaker

Karl Critz (SDM ’10) is a clean energy innovator. The research presented in this talk is the result of a forthcoming publication with the National Renewable Energy Lab. As a developer and product manager, Critz has launched successful products in the controls software and medical device spaces. He is currently working on smart grid technologies to speed integration of practical residential solar power.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

A Systems View of Enabling Enterprise Change

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesMark Moran

Mark Moran, SDM ’09
Manager of Portfolio Management and Marketing Operations, Enterprise Advanced Marketing Group, John Deere

Date: October 31, 2011

About the Presentation

Enterprise change is hard, especially for mature, successful companies. Many of the keys to accomplishing enterprise change come from seeing the enterprise itself as a complex system. This presentation will discuss many of the ingredients necessary for an enterprise to change itself and acquire new capabilities. It will be based on Moran’s experience with enterprise change efforts at John Deere.

About the Speaker

Mark Moran is the Manager of Portfolio Management and Marketing Operations for John Deere’s Enterprise Advanced Marketing Group. In that role, he leads a team responsible for front end innovation and portfolio management for Deere’s Accelerated Innovation Process. For most of his 13-plus years with John Deere, Moran has been involved in managing and leading large information technology programs, including deploying open systems to the enterprise data center, building out Deere’s Internet infrastructure, building a redundant data center, and deploying RFID and related technologies throughout John Deere’s value chain from suppliers to dealers. Prior to joining John Deere, Moran was a civil engineer focused on airport construction.

Moran received his BS in general engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993, and his MBA from the University of Iowa in 2003. He is an alumnus of MIT’s System Design and Management Program, which is co-sponsored by MIT’s School of Engineering and the MIT Sloan School of Management, and received an SM in engineering and management from MIT in 2011.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Transforming the Industrial State: The Ultimate Complex System Challenge

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesNicholas A. Ashford

Nicholas A. Ashford, PhD, JD
Professor of Technology and Policy, MIT
Director, MIT Technology and Law Program

Date: October 17, 2011
About the Presentation

The most crucial problem in achieving a more sustainable industrial system is lock-in or path dependency due to (1) the failure to envision, design, and implement policies that achieve co-optimization, or the mutually reinforcing of social goals (economic welfare, environmental quality, and earning capacity), and (2) entrenched economic and political interests that game (and gain from) the present system and advancement of its current trends. It is argued that industrial policy, environmental law and policy, and trade initiatives must be ‘opened up’ by expanding the practice of multi-purpose policy design and that these policies must be integrated as well. Integration can result in stronger, but not necessarily bigger, government. Sustainable development requires stimulating revolutionary technological and institutional innovation through environmental, health, safety, economic, labor-market, and trade regulation. Greater support for these changes must also be reinforced by ‘opening up the participatory and political space’ to enable new voices to contribute to integrated systems thinking and solutions. Societal innovations and transformation are also needed, but they are insufficient by themselves to transcend technical, economic, financial, and political lock-in. Law is key to accomplishing both. Insights from a new book: Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development: Transforming the Industrial State (2011, Yale University Press) will inform the presentation.

About the Speaker

Professor Nicholas A. Ashford teaches courses in Environmental Law, Policy, & Economics; Law, Technology, & Public Policy; and Sustainability, Trade & Environment. Ashford is a faculty associate of the Center for Technology, Policy, and Industrial Development in the School of Engineering; the Institute for Work and Employment Research in the Sloan School of Management; and the Environmental Policy Group in the Urban Studies Department. He holds both a PhD in chemistry and a law degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in economics. Ashford’s courses, jointly listed with ESD/Engineering, the Sloan School, and Urban Studies, draw students from all over the Institute. He has supervised graduate theses in the TPP, ESD, and SDM programs.

Ashford is the co-author of two recent textbooks/readers: Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development: Transforming the Industrial State (2011, Yale University Press) and Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Reclaiming the Environmental Agenda (2008, MIT Press). He has published five additional books and several hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews.

Ashford was a public member and chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety & Health, served on the EPA Science Advisory Board, and was chairman of the Committee on Technology Innovation & Economics of the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology. Ashford is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and former chair of its Section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering. He served as an advisor to the United Nations Environment Programme and currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Cleaner Production; the Journal of Environmental Technology and Management; the Journal of Environmental Policy and Governance; and Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Optimizing the Supply Chain of Medical Devices: A Shared SaaS Platform for Suppliers and Providers (A two-part series)

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Jean–Claude Saghbini

Jean–Claude Saghbini, SDM ’03
CTO, WaveMark Inc.

Date: September 19, 2011 and September 26, 2011


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About the Presentation

The United States spends over twice as much on healthcare per person as other industrialized nations. This has prompted initiatives to improve healthcare outcomes and lower costs.

One area targeted for cost savings is the supply chain. While the supply chain in other industries, such as retail, have been optimized using Point of Service (POS) technologies and Just in Time (JIT) techniques, the framework for delivering healthcare contradicts many of the foundational assumptions of supply chain solutions. The result is that healthcare providers carry medical device inventory in a complex mix of consigned and purchased products, valued at millions of dollars, yet still plagued by problems of product expiration, overstocking, stock shortages, and human error.

This presentation is the first of a two-part series. It will describe a systems approach to optimizing the supply chain of high value consumable medical devices, as realized in the WaveMark platform. The guiding principles are that accuracy in terms of product availability is critical to patient outcome, and that optimization can only be achieved through end-to-end visibility of the product life cycle across the supply chain, from the point of manufacture to the point of patient implant or use.

The platform is a cross-enterprise real-time SaaS solution shared between medical device suppliers and healthcare providers. It incorporates a distributed network of high-accuracy RFID data collection nodes and mobile devices throughout the supply chain. The resulting shared visibility enables a collaborative system-wide optimization capability.

About the Speaker

Prior to joining WaveMark, Jean-Claude Saghbini was an architect and manager of software development at EMC, where he built an organization of 25 software developers. Before EMC, Saghbini worked on digital imaging products at Polaroid. During his tenure, he had a unique multidisciplinary role in mechanical engineering, software development, and systems integration. He was more recently involved with the inception of Fantasy Seats, a venture designed to create a futures market for sporting events.

As an alumnus of MIT’s System Design and Management (SDM) Program, Saghbini earned an MS in engineering and management from MIT. He also holds a master of science degree in mechanical engineering from MIT, and a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Why Systems Thinking is Not a Natural Act

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Ricardo Valerdi, Associate Professor, University of Arizona

Date: August 22, 2011


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About the Presentation

Ricardo ValerdiCompetence in systems thinking is implicitly assumed among the population of engineers and managers — in fact, most technical people claim to be systems thinkers. But this competence is not as prevalent as these assertions might lead one to assume. Controlled experiments show that systems thinking performance, even among highly educated people, is poor. This presentation provides a set of systems thinking competencies and demonstrates how these are not as common as advertised. We also discuss how these competencies can be measured.

The main thesis is that systems thinking is not a natural act because (1) evolution has favored mechanisms tuned to dealing with immediate surface features of problems and (2) the Western education system tends to emphasize reductionist approaches. We discuss the implications of the current state and provide recommendations for closing the gap between the demand and supply of systems thinking through the use of systems thinking flight simulators. Finally, key takeaways are provided for the application of systems thinking across a variety of scenarios.

About the Speaker

Now an associate professor at the University of Arizona, Ricardo Valerdi was formerly a research associate in the Lean Advancement Initiative in the Engineering Systems Division at MIT.

Dr. Valerdi is a two-time recipient of the Best Thesis Advisor Award in the MIT Technology & Policy Program, the Best Article of the Year Award in the Systems Engineering Journal, and Best Paper Awards at the INCOSE Symposium, Conference on Systems Engineering Research and International Society of Parametric Analysts.

His research focuses on systems engineering metrics, cost estimation, test & evaluation, human systems integration, enterprise transformation, and performance measurement. His research has been funded by Army Test & Evaluation, Navy Acquisition Research Program, Air Force Office of the Surgeon General, Air Force Acquisition Chief Process Office, BAE Systems, and the IBM Center for the Business of Government.

Dr. Valerdi is the co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Enterprise Transformation, served on the Board of Directors of the International Council on Systems Engineering, and is a senior member of the IEEE. He received his BS/BA in electrical engineering from the University of San Diego in 1999, and his MS and PhD degrees in systems architecting and engineering from the University of Southern California in 2002 and 2005.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Anomalies or Leading Indicators? Recent System Failures in IT Security, Manufacturing, and Natural Resource Extraction

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Seriesspear

Steven J. Spear, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management, Senior Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division, and author, The High Velocity Edge


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Date: August 8, 2011

About the Presentation

In recent months, we’ve been awash in major system failures — BP, Toyota, a host of IT security breaches at the International Monetary Fund, Apple, Sony, Citibank, and elsewhere.

The purpose of this webinar is to explore two alternative explanations of why so many complex operating systems have failed so significantly in rapid succession The webinar will also offer insight into how complex operating systems can be managed for far greater success.

One explanation is that these are anomalies — flukes, ‘bolt out of the blue’ technological failures that motivate technological fixes.

An alternative explanation is that these events are “leading indicators”, signs of worse to come. The underlying logic is that these systems have steadily changed from simpler and more stable systems to increasingly complex and dynamic over weeks and months. What hasn’t changed is how these systems are managed — i.e., with approaches that, while appropriate for simple and stable processes are inadequate for those that are complex and dynamic.

By the end of the webinar, attendees will understand:

  • the distinction between simple and stable systems and complex dynamic ones.
  • characteristics of management approaches that are adequate for simple, stable system and how these approaches fail for complex, dynamic ones.
  • what approaches are required for managing complex, dynamic systems.

Through a combination of real time question and answer during the webinar and personal reflection, attendees should be able to:

  • characterize the systems on which they depend and for which they are responsible, in terms of simple, stable versus complex and dynamic.
  • critique the appropriateness of their own management approach
  • identify changes in management approach that can lead to greater reliability and responsiveness.

About the Speaker

Operational excellence and innovation expert Steven J. Spear is a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. His book, The High Velocity Edge, has won numerous awards including the Philip Crosby Medal from the American Society for Quality (ASQ) in 2011.

Spear is an internationally recognized expert in leadership, innovation, and operational excellence, and he is an authority on how select companies in high tech and heavy industry, design and production, manufacturing and services generate unmatchable performance by converting improvement and innovation from the rare kiss of inspiration to repeatable, broad-based, skill-based disciplines.

Spear’s research has been exceptionally well acknowledged with five Shingo Prizes and a McKinsey award from Harvard Business Review. Spear’s Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System and Learning to Lead at Toyota, are part of the lean manufacturing canon. His Fixing Healthcare from the Inside, Today and articles in Annals of Internal Medicine and Academic Medicine have been on the forefront in health care improvement. He has contributed to the Boston Globe and New York Times, has appeared on Bloomberg TV and radio, CBS, and elsewhere. His clients have included well-known corporations like Intel, Lockheed Martin, Intuit, Novelis, Alcoa, General Electric, Memorial Sloan Kettering, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Among other accomplishments, Spear helped the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative create its ‘Perfecting Patient Care System.’ That has been credited with eliminating horrible complications like central line infections and thereby improving care quality while reducing costs. The Alcoa Business System, which he helped design and launch, is regularly credited with hundreds of millions of dollars in annual savings. Other clients have dramatically compressed time and costs for marketing processes, new product development, and software design.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Five Capabilities for Enterprise Change: Approaches for Integrating Continuous Improvement and Strategic Change Across Organizations

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Seriesroth

George Roth, Principal Research Associate, MIT

Date: July 25, 2011


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About the Presentation

Successful organizations must do more than manage their own changes; they must also adapt and change the larger system in which they operate. The history of and prognosis for managing organizational changes is not good. Researchers consistently find that nearly two-thirds of change efforts, whether re-engineering, quality, lean, or other improvement initiatives, do not achieve their goals. There is perhaps nothing more important in business today than for managers and their organizations to be able to learn and change effectively.

This webinar presents studies of what organizations have done to successfully extend their learning and change efforts to sets of organizations, or enterprise changes. These approaches were found by examining improvement efforts begun with lean and other continuous improvement methods and extended beyond the original firm. The companies and their managers went from operating as organizations to performing as enterprises, achieving and sustaining significant improvements across all dimensions of financial and operational results.

These studies are used to identify five enterprise change capabilities. These capabilities are developed and deployed in managing the revolution and transformation that enables sets of organizations to function as high-performing enterprises. These five enterprise change capabilities can be used to diagnose and guide other organizations’ current change approaches and assess their abilities to achieve and sustain high levels of enterprise performance.

An emphasis in this webinar will be on a recently completed series of case studies on the history and application of the United Technologies Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE) operating system. Over the past 20 years, UTC has developed its operating system, and through it outperformed all other large corporations (based on stock performance) in the decade from 2000 to 2009. What UTC has developed and deployed illustrates its enterprise change capabilities, and how a system of change based on developing capabilities leads to enterprise excellence.

About the Speaker

George Roth is a principal research associate at MIT’s Lean Advancement Initiative (formerly Lean Aerospace Initiative). He is currently working on a book about enterprise change — a theory and approach for managing across organizations. He illustrates these ideas with cases studies to show how some organizations and their people achieved and sustained high enterprise performance. This new research on change across organizations builds upon his previous work on organizational leadership, learning, change, and culture.

Roth is a past chair of the Organization Development and Change Division of the Academy of Management and a founding member of the Society for Organizational Learning. He is the author of numerous award-winning academic and professional journal articles on learning and change, including articles in the Harvard Business Review, Organizational Dynamics and AQP Journal describing new approaches to diffusing learning across organizations. Other writing about companies’ experiences in developing, sustaining, and transforming learning are in his co-authored books: To the Desert and Back: The Story of One of the Most Dramatic Business Transformations on Record; The Dance of Change: The Challenges to Sustaining Momentum in Learning Organizations; Car Launch: Managing the Human Side of Change; and Oil Change: Perspectives on Corporate Transformation.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Transformation at Bank of America: An Enterprise Systems Analysis

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Serieswallance

Daniel Wallance, SDM ’11

Date: July 11, 2011


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About the Presentation

With a historic collapse of world financial markets and the nearly finished integration of the Merrill Lynch and Countrywide acquisitions, Bank of America Corporation found itself looking inward for initiatives to decrease operational risk and streamline bank operations.

One significant change management initiative currently under way is the California Northwest (CANW) transformation. As part of Bank of America’s internal evaluation, senior executives identified this region as offering the greatest potential to both decrease operational risk and simultaneously to offer additional value to its customers. The focus of the CANW initiative is a multi-year and multi-hundred-million-dollar integration initiative to “provide nationwide consistency and efficiencies in processing and servicing customers and clients” and to “migrate to standard processes and technology across the enterprise.”

This webinar focuses on a six-month consulting engagement that applied key systems thinking principles, tools, and methods to evaluate the CANW transformation initiative and large-scale change management practices overall at Bank of America. MIT Lean Advancement Initiative’s Enterprise Strategic Analysis and Transformation methodology is used as a framework to evaluate the alignment of stakeholder needs with CANW goals, processes, metrics, and strategic objectives.

The study reveals that Bank of America should take a stakeholder-centric view and consider the needs of all stakeholders to gain “buy-in” from all parties for transformation initiatives.

About the Speaker

Daniel Wallance, a recent graduate of MIT’s System Design and Management Program (SDM), has several years of experience in finance, operations, and information technology. While at MIT, he focused his studies on operations management and completed a six-month consulting engagement with Bank of America Corporation for his master’s thesis. While at SDM, he also studied business and technology strategy at Harvard Business School.

Wallance joined SDM from a boutique hedge fund founded by a former director of Kmart Holding Corporation; he served as director of operations and as an investment analyst. Previously, he was a consultant to a NASA contractor, where he developed proposals for Mars missions and defense contracts. He also established his own private technology consulting firm with over 20 clients.

Wallance holds an MS from MIT in engineering and management and a BS in electrical and computer engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where he was a member of the engineering honor societies Tau Beta Pi and Eta Kappa Nu.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Scientific Methods to Reduce System Testing Cost and Risk

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesMadhav S. Phadke

Madhav S. Phadke, PhD
President, Phadke Associates Inc.

Date: June 28, 2011

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About the Presentation

Software and system testing costs hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Testing also takes multiple months, delaying time to market. Several major defense and commercial firms are therefore embarking on using orthogonal arrays (OAs) to reduce the cost of testing and time to market while ensuring that technology defects are not passed onto the customer.

OAs provide a systematic, scientific, and repeatable approach to generating test plans that reduce testing costs by an estimated 40 percent while providing additional capacity to detect faults. OAs also have distinct advantages for results analysis and defect isolation, delivering savings throughout the life cycle.

In this webinar, Dr. Phadke will describe the fundamentals of using OAs for test planning using examples from defense systems; present results of 20 side-by-side IT and software testing pilots conducted in the financial services industry; compare OA-based testing with other test planning methods (pairwise, n-way, and design of experiments); and describe a commercial software toolset (rdExpert™ Test Suite) used for OA-based testing.

About the Speaker

Dr. Madhav S. Phadke is the founder and president of Phadke Associates Inc. He is an ASQ Fellow and the author of the first engineering textbook on robust design methods in the United States, Quality Engineering Using Robust Design. He holds a PhD in mechanical engineering and an MS in statistics from the University of Wisconsin—Madison, an MS in mechanical and aerospace sciences from the University of Rochester, and a BTech in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology—Mumbai. Prior to founding Phadke Associates, Dr. Phadke was a manager at AT&T Bell Labs, a visiting scientist at the IBM Watson Research Center, and a research associate at the Mathematics Research Center and Statistics Department of the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Designing Systems for People

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesTodd Reily

Todd Reily, Lead Human Factors Engineer, The MITRE Corporation

Date: June 20, 2011

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About the Presentation

Today’s consumer technology market has evolved in complexity and interconnectedness at an ever-increasing rate. As these products and services become increasingly intertwined, the opportunity for overwhelming the people that use them has heightened tremendously. As a result of this situation, the importance of “user experience” design has risen in the eyes of most organizations. However, many of these same organizations continue to produce poorly designed products or complicated service experiences because they fail to understand that great experience design does not come from an isolated design stage, but from a fully integrated design and engineering process that elevates user experience. The difference is subtle but significant. The difference is systems thinking. This webinar presents a systems-based, design-centric framework for producing great product or service experiences. It will demonstrate the importance of this type of approach for understanding markets, developing concepts, providing vision, managing uncertainty, crafting requirements, creating prototypes, and testing new markets.

About the Speaker

Todd Reily (SDM ’10) has over a decade of experience in the public and private sector in roles that range from internal support to consulting, as a designer or design lead, in activities including behavioral research, conceptual user experience animations, and interactive prototypes. He has consulted on design projects for the most prominent organizations in the consumer product, pharmaceutical, financial services, and defense industries.

Reily is currently pursuing a master’s of science in engineering and management on a part-time basis in MIT’s System Design and Management program. Reily is applying his skills in user experience design and engineering psychology to the principles of system design in an effort to develop innovative methods in product and system development. Reily also holds a BS in engineering psychology from Tufts University. While at Tufts, Reily served as president of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society and received the De Florez Prize in Human Engineering.

Reily’s full-time professional role is as a lead human factors engineer at The MITRE Corporation, a federally funded not-for-profit research and development center based in Bedford, MA. Reily’s primary responsibility is to support MITRE’s customers by identifying human-based issues and addressing them with design-driven solutions and innovative user experience designs. Prior to MITRE, Reily was a lead usability analyst at Human Factors International, the world’s oldest and largest usability and design consulting firm. In that role, Reily consulted for high-profile clients in a range of industries, from home and entertainment to enterprise and financial services.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

How to Manage a Profitability Turnaround

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesJonathan Byrnes

Jonathan L.S. Byrnes, Senior Lecturer, MIT

Date: June 6, 2011

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About the Presentation

We now live in the Age of Precision Markets, yet most of the management processes taught in business schools were developed for the prior Age of Mass Markets. Today’s savviest managers are exploiting this disconnect by rethinking strategy and, in the process, developing fresh approaches to customer relations, operations, and metrics. Dr. Jonathan Byrnes believes that every business has enormous potential waiting to be unleashed and in this webinar, he offers bold new strategies to help you find and grow your islands of profit.

Byrnes will discuss an astonishing fact from his award-winning new book, Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink: it is possible for every manager to meet or exceed budget targets and for the company to still have an enormous portion of its business remain unprofitable. In fact, nearly 40 percent of every company is unprofitable by any measure, and 20 to 30 percent is so profitable that it provides all the reported earnings and subsidizes the losses.

Dr. Byrnes will explain — and then reject — such harmful myths as:

  • Revenues are good, costs are bad
  • All customers should get the same great service
  • If everyone does his or her job well, the company will prosper

In addition he will provide a practical, step-by-step guide to raising net profits by as much as 50 percent.

About the Speaker

Jonathan L.S. Byrnes, senior lecturer at MIT, is an acknowledged authority on supply chain management, account management, and profitability management. His extensive experience spans virtually every industry, including healthcare, transportation, software, retail, financial services, distribution, and others.

At MIT, Dr. Byrnes has taught at the graduate level and in executive programs for 20 years. He has authored over 100 books, articles, cases, notes, and expert submissions. In addition, he wrote a monthly column on managing profitability for Harvard Business School’s Working Knowledge for four years, and recently authored Islands of Profit in a Sea of Red Ink, which Inc.com named to its list of Best Business Books of 2010.

He also is president of Jonathan Byrnes & Co., a consulting company founded in 1976. In that role he has advised over 50 major companies, medical institutions, and industry associations. Dr. Byrnes serves on the Board of Directors of MSC Industrial Direct, Inc. (a New York Stock Exchange company) and has served on the advisory boards of Objectiva Software and Autopart International, two companies that were acquired at a substantial gain. He currently serves on the advisory boards of RMG Networks, OCO, and WaveMark, all development-stage companies. Dr. Byrnes earned a DBA from Harvard University in 1980.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Changing Nature of Research and Innovation in the 21st Century

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Seriesberger

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, PhD
Chairman Emeritus, IBM Academy of Technology, Visiting Lecturer of Engineering Systems

Date: May 23, 2011

About the Presentation

Over the past century, science and technology have been successfully applied to innovation in the industrial sector of the economy, leading to very high productivity and quality, and to the development of highly sophisticated and complex objects like airplanes, skyscrapers and microprocessors. The 21st century defines a new set of challenges, especially in the complexity of the systems we are now developing in all kinds of industries, including energy, health care, financial services and urban systems.

It is critical to once more leverage technology, science and innovation to address these challenges and make major improvements in the productivity and quality of these highly complex systems, including services, organizations and the very way the world works. Continuing advances in digital technologies promise to be as pivotal to the 21st century as steam power was to the industrial revolution, leading to an information and services driven economy which is changing the focus, design objectives and the methods by which the world innovates to meet global challenges.

The presentation will explore the key differences between “classic” industrial sector innovation and innovation in this emerging information and services economy, as well as the growing technical capabilities and business opportunities for organizations that embrace these new modes of innovation.

About the Speaker

Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger retired from IBM in 2007 after 37 years with the company. As chairman emeritus, IBM Academy of Technology, he continues to participate in a number of IBM’s technical strategy and innovation initiatives. He is also visiting lecturer of engineering systems at MIT, where he is involved in multidisciplinary research and teaching activities focused on how information technologies are helping transform business organizations and the institutions of society.

At IBM he was responsible for identifying emerging technologies and marketplace developments critical to the future of the IT industry, and organizing appropriate activities in and outside IBM in order to capitalize on them. He was also responsible for IBM’s university relations office and for the IBM Academy of Technology where he served as chairman of the Board of Governors. In 1996, he led the effort to formulate IBM’s Internet strategy and to develop and bring to market leading-edge Internet technologies that could be integrated into IBM’s mainstream business. He subsequently led a number of companywide initiatives like Linux, Grid Computing and the On Demand Business initiative.

He began his IBM career in 1970 at the company’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center, where he started technology transfer programs to move the innovations of computer science from IBM’s research labs into its product divisions. After joining IBM’s product development organization in 1985, he continued his efforts to bring advanced technologies to the marketplace, leading IBM’s initiatives in supercomputing and parallel computing, including the transformation of IBM’s large commercial systems to parallel architectures. He has managed a number of IBM’s businesses, including the large systems software and the UNIX systems divisions.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger is adjunct professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School. He is a member of BP’s Technology Advisory Council, the Visiting Committee for the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and the Board of Visitors for the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He was co-chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, as well as a founding member of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He is a former member of the University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratories and of the Board of Overseers for Fermilab. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A native of Cuba, he was named the 2001 Hispanic Engineer of the Year.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger received an MS and a PhD in physics from the University of Chicago.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Systems Thinking and the Development of a Large-Scale, Secure Network for Comparative Effectiveness Healthcare Research

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Serieshartzband

David Hartzband, D.Sc.
Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Date: May 9, 2011

About the Presentation

SCANNER (SCAlable Nationwide Network for Effectiveness Research, R01 HS19913-01) is a three-year, $8M grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality made to the Division of Biomedical Informatics at the University of California, San Diego. In this presentation, Dr. Hartzband will describe how the design of the SCANNER network takes advantage of innovative thinking in design and deployment. The network does this by enabling edge nodes that own resources (data &/or function) to specify security and usage policies that are separate from application or database logic and that are resolved by specialized servers distributed on the network. The network also makes use of a syndication model for identity correlation that provides a mechanism for very high probability correlation of a user identity with a set of known attributes. The combination of these mechanisms allows for easy sharing of data, analytic function & results across sites.

Dr. Hartzband will also describe how the network will support a series of observational and interventional comparative effectiveness trials. Initial deployment is now underway at UCSD with trials to start by early summer. He will discuss how the application of systems thinking to the design of the network resulted in approaches that not only allow data and results to be shared, but also allow policies to be developed and shared across institutional sites.

About the Speaker

David Hartzband, D.Sc., Lecturer, MIT Engineering Systems Division, is co-principal investigator, technology, responsible for the design and deployment of the scalable secure network to support comparative effectiveness research at multiple sites within UCSD, as well as sites at Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is also part-time director of technology research for the RCHN Community Health Foundation in New York, where he is responsible for developing and delivering a program on technology awareness and adoption for community health centers.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Using Quality by Design (QbD) and Systems Thinking in the Development, Commercialization and Life Cycle Management of Medicines and Vaccines

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Serieschowdhury

Anando A. Chowdhury, Director, Organizational Strategy, Management & Operations, Global Science, Technology & Commercialization, Merck/MSD

Date: April 25, 2011

About the Presentation

Healthcare solution providers developing innovative medicines work within a complex ecosystem of pharmaceuticals and biologics technologies, shifting political, economic and regulatory trends, and a multitude of stakeholders that includes patients, physicians, nurses, payers, partners and competitors. What is at stake is nothing short of collectively bending the course of global human health towards improved wellness for all humanity. In this extremely complex environment, there is one strategic certainty: systems thinking is essential.

This presentation will highlight implementation challenges and successes of the Quality by Design (QbD) paradigm in the arena of medicinal and vaccine development, commercialization, and supply. It will demonstrate that QbD is the true embodiment of systems thinking in the drug development space by discussing advantages and challenges of adopting associated mindsets, methodologies, and tools.

About the Speaker

Anando A. Chowdhury, SDM ’09, works at Merck/MSD in Whitehouse Station, NJ leading the organizational strategy, management and operations function for Merck’s Global Science, Technology and Commercialization organization. His organization enables Merck to meet its promise to the patient/customer through the development, commercialization, launch and manufacturing technical support of all pharmaceutical, biologic, vaccine and consumer products and associated packaging.

Chowdhury is currently a Fellow in MIT’s System Design and Management Program. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering from the University of Rochester, is a Six Sigma Black Belt and a graduate of Merck’s Business Leadership Program through Duke University.

About the Series

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Dynamic Time Metered Delivery (DTMD): Potential Effect on the Goals of the Federal Communications Commission’s National Broadband Plan

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

 

poseyBrian Wenford Jesse Posey, Cofounder, President, and CEO, TelePulse Technologies Corporation

Date: April 11, 2011


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About the Presentation

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has stated that broadband is the great infrastructure challenge of the early 21st century. On March 16, 2010, the FCC published “Connecting America: The National Broadband Plan.” One of the goals of the FCC plan is to have 100M US households with affordable access to actual download speeds of at least 100Mbps and actual upload speeds of at least 50Mbps. The FCC also has the goal that every American should have affordable access to robust broadband (5Mbps) service. This webinar examines the potential use of Dynamic Time Metered Delivery (DTMD) in the furtherance of these goals using data and analysis from public sources and TelePulse Technologies Corporation (inventors of DTMD). The key questions the research proposes to answer are:

  • Using Hypercube analysis, how would key elements of the value chain for phone companies categorize and react to DTMD as an innovation?
  • Are there specific goals of the FCC National Broadband Plan that might be directly furthered by the use of DTMD?

By decreasing the price of broadband performance, DTMD can further FCC’s goals for broadband adoption in rural communities, less dense suburban communities, and low-income urban communities. With DTMD and without capital expenditure, the current broadband un-served can be provided with a broadband speed of minimum 5Mbps on their current phone lines. The cost for a phone company to provide the service goes from being a capital expenditure to a consumable expenditure. In the case of broadband deployment, for rural communities, less dense urban communities and low-income urban communities, private sector business goals and public sector goals conflict. Various parts of a broadband provider’s value chain may see needed innovation as potentially disruptive, lacking a robust total market, or lacking a high degree of interest by the service provider (the perceived driver of market volume). While private sector investment in broadband has increased, that funding is focused more on incremental improvement to market-proven technologies. FCC-driven investment opportunities and incentives to innovate for the un-served should include opportunities to use technologies that are not fully market-proven.

About the Speaker

B.W. “Jess” Posey is co-founder, president, and CEO of TelePulse Technologies Corporation, a high-tech startup based in Alexandria, VA, and Chester Springs, PA, specializing in “last mile” solutions in broadband telecommunications.

In June, Jess will graduate with an SM in engineering and management from the System Design and Management Program at MIT. He also holds an MBA from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a BS in physics and political science from the US Naval Academy.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Status of Grid-scale Energy Storage and Strategies for Accelerating Cost-effective Deployment

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Serieskluza

John Kluza, Business Development Manager for Emerging Applications at Satcon Technology

Date: March 28, 2011

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About the Presentation

The development of emerging grid-scale energy storage technologies offers great potential to improve the architecture and operation of the electrical grid. This is especially important in the face of increased reliance on clean, dependable electricity and with the influx of renewable generation and smart grid technology. However, at the present, grid-scale energy storage is still in an early, developing stage.

This presentation brings together a broad overview of the sector, including rough revenue estimates for each individually possible application for energy storage, a high-level overview that includes rough cost estimates of each technology and supplier, and a more focused look at the actual or possible implementations in the market with rough estimates of the systems’ economics in each implementation. It includes a discussion of notable dynamics and potentially effective strategies, based on current industry conditions and existing academic management frameworks. The investigation was accomplished by leveraging prior research in existing literature, and extending it with first-hand discussions with industry leaders and market analysis.

About the Speaker

John Kluza is currently the business development manager for emerging applications at Satcon Technology. At Satcon, he is leveraging Satcon’s solar PV power conversion and grid connection expertise in the energy storage market. Before Satcon, Kluza was an energy storage and smart grid analyst at Lux Research. Before this, Kluza graduated in 2009 from MIT SDM where he investigated the grid-scale energy storage market for his thesis. While at MIT, Kluza worked at A123 Systems.

Prior to attending MIT, Kluza worked for five years as a consulting engineer and application engineer at The MathWorks, creators of MATLAB. Kluza earned his MS in mechanical engineering (Controls/Robotics) at Pennsylvania State University and his BS in mechanical engineering at Lehigh University.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Leadership, Innovation, and Operational Excellence: How Market Leaders Beat the Competition

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Seriesspear

Steven J. Spear, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management and Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Date: March 14, 2011


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About the Presentation

A few, select organizations create substantial, sustainable competitive advantage for themselves even in the absence of strong market position. They do this by generating and sustaining exceptional rates of internally generating improvement and innovation, leading to unmatchable levels of performance–quality, productivity, reliability, responsiveness, safety, and so forth.

This presentation will explore how this is accomplished, discussing the ‘basic science of operating systems’ that allows some to succeed whereas others struggle and how this ‘basic science’ can be incorporated to enhance an organization’s ability to ‘discovery its way to greatness.’

About the Speaker

Operational excellence and innovation expert Steven J. Spear is a senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. His book, The High Velocity Edge, has won numerous awards including the Philip Crosby Medal from the American Society for Quality (ASQ) in 2011.

Spear is an internationally recognized expert in leadership, innovation, and operational excellence, and he is an authority on how select companies in high tech and heavy industry, design and production, manufacturing and services generate unmatchable performance by converting improvement and innovation from the rare kiss of inspiration to repeatable, broad-based, skill-based disciplines.

Spear’s research has been exceptionally well acknowledged with five Shingo Prizes and a McKinsey award from Harvard Business Review. Spear’s Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System and Learning to Lead at Toyota, are part of the lean manufacturing canon. His Fixing Healthcare from the Inside, Today and articles in Annals of Internal Medicine and Academic Medicine have been on the forefront in health care improvement. He has contributed to the Boston Globe and New York Times, has appeared on Bloomberg TV and radio, CBS, and elsewhere. His clients have included well-known corporations like Intel, Lockheed Martin, Intuit, Novelis, Alcoa, General Electric, Memorial Sloan Kettering, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Among other accomplishments, Spear helped the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative create its ‘Perfecting Patient Care System.’ That has been credited with eliminating horrible complications like central line infections and thereby improving care quality while reducing costs. The Alcoa Business System, which he helped design and launch, is regularly credited with hundreds of millions of dollars in annual savings. Other clients have dramatically compressed time and costs for marketing processes, new product development, and software design.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

System Interaction Complexity Metrics and Its Application to Embedded Software Systems

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series

Qi Van Eikema Hommes, PhD, Research Scientist, MIT Engineering Systems Division

Date: February 28, 2011


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About the Presentation

System designers have long practiced decomposition and modularization to manage the complexity of systems. The byproduct of modularization is system interactions. Complex system interactions often took designers by surprise, causing schedule delays, rework, resource overruns, system integration challenges, failures, and accidents.

This research work compared a number of system interaction complexity measures, and identified the Whitney Index (WI) and Change Cost (CC) as a complementary pair of metrics that can characterize the system interaction complexity. The in- and out- Degree Centrality help identify the causes for high WI values. The Betweenness Centrality helps identify elements that cause high CC values. Other system interaction complexities written in some of the publications were actually not very helpful (Closeness centrality, overall network centrality measures, Singular Value Index, and Visibility-Dependency Plots).

The effectiveness of WI, CC, and Centrality measures were tested and confirmed using two large, complex, embedded software systems in an actual industry setting, as well as a plastic part design case in the industry. The case study on an embedded software system for the first time quantitatively demonstrated that embedded software systems may inherently have a much higher level of system interaction complexity than that of IT software systems. The high complexity could be attributed to degradation of the architecture over time, the inherent nature of the embedded software system, and the economic incentive of software development in a closed private company environment.

About the Speaker

Dr. Van Eikema Hommes’ research work focuses on developing methodologies that improve the design and development of large complex engineered products and systems. Her recent efforts include:

  • Predicting and managing system interaction complexity in the early phase of the product design and development process
  • Better translation of customer experiential needs to engineering design specifications
  • Real options valuation for architecture flexibility in product design under market uncertainty
  • System theoretical product failure investigation process

Prior to coming to MIT, Dr. Van Eikema Hommes was a senior research scientist with the General Motors Research and Development Division. Her work there involved qualitative and quantitative market research to understand customer needs, purchase intent, and to forecast price and market share of GM’s products. She led a project using Real Options techniques to quantify the value of flexibility in engineering architecture decisions for new vehicle features in one of GM’s global vehicle platform.

In her earlier career, Dr. Van Eikema Hommes was a Powertrain system engineer at Ford Motor Company. She rotated through a number of positions from the early stage of the product development process to manufacturing, including model-based systems engineering for embedded engine control software design, requirements engineering for the Powertrain controls system, and calibration, design, and release of the exhaust subsystem, engine manufacturing quality, and lead engineer for warranty issue resolution.

Dr. Van Eikema Hommes holds MS and PhD degrees from the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. She is a certified Six Sigma Black Belt. She has published a number of peer-reviewed papers in the ASME DETC DTM conferences and the INCOSE conference. She authored several internal technical publications at both Ford and GM as well.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Systems Thinking and Software Architecture

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Seriesmiyachi

Christine Miyachi, SDM Alumnus and Principle Systems Engineer and Architect, Xerox Corporation


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Date: February 14, 2011

About the Presentation

Software architecture is an elusive topic — even to professionals who work with software day in and day out. Although software architecture is often deemed required, it’s frequently dropped when the schedule gets tight (and the schedule always gets tight). However, software architecture will occur by default by daily decisions made by a project team. This webinar highlights specific tools proven to work in real project situations.

About the Speaker

SDM alumna Christine Miyachi has over 25 years of experience working for both start ups and large corporations. She has a weekly blog about software architecture: http://abstractsoftware.blogspot.com/. She is currently a Principal Systems Engineer and Architect at Xerox Corporation and holds several patents. Miyachi graduated from the University of Rochester with a BS in Electrical Engineering. She holds two MIT graduate degrees: an MS in Technology and Policy/ Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and and an MS in Engineering and Management (SDM). Her full resume is at http://home.comcast.net/~cmiyachi/.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address the engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

On Developing Business Architectures: A Multi-Framework Evaluation of an Early Stage Enterprise

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesMario Montoya

Mario Montoya, SDM alumnus and Manager, Business Development, OmniGuide, Inc.

December 20, 2010

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About the Presentation

This presentation examines the efficiency and effectiveness of using multiple frameworks to analyze an early stage enterprise within the medical technology industry, Lentesco Luminarium. The company faces a critical choice between two growth strategies: vertical penetration within existing modalities or horizontal growth into new modalities, so Montoya will explore what tools might inform and guide the executive team to make the right decision for Lentesco’s particular industry, maturity, and size. In addition to the standard Lean Advancement Initiative suite of tools, he uses Nightingale and Rhodes’ eight Enterprise Architecture views, Kaplan’s Balanced Scorecard, Piepenbrock’s Evolution of Business Ecosystems, McKinsey’s 7S framework, and Grave’s Spiral Dynamics. He concludes that Lentesco needs to improve transparency and communication, and he suggests the use of the McKinsey 7S framework to put concepts into perspective as simply as possible. For a multiple perspective evaluation, he suggests the EA 8 Views framework.

About the Speaker

Mario Montoya joined MIT’s System Design and Management Program (SDM) in 2009, where he conducted research on an early stage enterprise as a part of two class projects and his master’s thesis. After graduating from MIT with an MS in Engineering and Management, Mario joined the business development group at OmniGuide, Inc. to assess and develop new markets for their technology. Prior to OmniGuide, Mario participated in the development and manufacture of aerospace composites for various primes such as Honeywell, Boeing, and Rolls-Royce at Texas Composite, Inc. He holds a BS in mechanical engineering from MIT.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

Analysis of Value Creation and Value Capture in the Microfluidics Market

 

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar SeriesShailendra Anand Yadav

Shailendra Anand Yadav, SDM ’10 and Bio-Automation Manager, The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

December 6, 2010


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About the Presentation

In the last two decades, microfluidics has been changing the shape of genomics, drug discovery, proteomics, and point-of-care diagnostics. Advances in the technology have resulted in faster analysis time, increased throughput, and reduced cost, among other important benefits. However, Yadav reports that the life sciences end-users and the microfluidics players themselves are far from fully capturing the value of these advances. As an immature technology, microfluidics is to-date still only in the hands of innovators and early adopters, who are academic laboratories and research institutes. He will analyze the current state of the market and discuss genomics and point-of-care diagnostics that have captured the most value from the technology, while drug discovery has seen the least. He will also recommend short- and long-term strategies for increasing value capture and accelerating the adoption of microfluidics.

About the Speaker

Shailendra Anand Yadav joined MIT’s System Design and Management program in 2008, where he conducted research on microfluidics market as a part of his master’s thesis. After graduating from MIT in 2010 with an MS in Engineering and Management, Shailendra is leading an engineering group at The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT to develop new product for genome sequencing process improvement. Prior to Broad, Shailendra participated in the development of large-scale automated system for the Human Genome Project at the Whitehead Institute. He holds an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Tufts University and a BE in Mechanical Engineering from Punjab Engineering College, India.

The MIT System Design and Management Program Webinar Series on Systems Thinking for Contemporary Challenges features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges.

The Evolution of Business Ecosystems: Interspecies Competition in the Steel Industry

 

Date: November 8, 2010Akshat Mathur

Speakers: Akshat Mathur, SDM alum and Ted Piepenbrock, Ph.D.Theodore Piepenbrock

Title: The Evolution of Business Ecosystems: Interspecies Competition in the Steel Industry

Abstract: This presentation builds on the work of Theodore F. Piepenbrock, whose 2009 MIT doctoral thesis, “Towards a Theory of Evolution of Business Ecosystems,” proposed that firms in the same industry vary systematically in performance over time as a result of differences in architecture. Piepenbrock defines architecture in terms of the strength, closeness, and the specific morphology of relationships that exist between the core firm and the four markets that are its key stakeholders-product markets, capital markets, supplier markets and labor markets. Mathur extends Piepenbrock’s model to examine its validity in commodity industries, specifically the steel industry from the 1860s to the present.

Bios:
Akshat Mathur is a recent SDM alum and an accomplished operations and supply chain management professional. Graduating with a Metallurgical Engineering degree in 1995, he went on to a career in various operations management, strategy and planning roles in the steel industry in India, before joining the SDM program in 2008. While at SDM, his interest was strongly piqued by the path-breaking research of Ted Piepenbrock in the field of evolution of business ecosystems. With his background in the steel industry, he explored about the applicability of Piepenbrock’s framework to the Steel industry and other commodity industries. His thesis, the topic of this webinar, is the result of his working closely with Ted to analyze and examine the applicability of the Theory of Evolution of Business Ecosystems to the US steel industry.

Dr. Theodore Piepenbrock is an international researcher, lecturer and consultant in strategic management, leadership and macro-organizational change to leading universities and global Fortune 100 companies. Throughout his career, he has worked in over twenty countries, lectured on management and engineering in many of the world’s leading universities (e.g. MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, Stanford, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial College, UCL, Tokyo Institute of Technology), has appeared in various international news media (e.g. CNN-TV, BBC-TV, ITV, SKY-TV, The Learning Channel, The Discovery Channel) and his work has featured in the business press (e.g. Forbes and MIT Sloan Management Review).He received an interdisciplinary B.Sc. in engineering & humanities as a Da Vinci scholar, an M.Eng. in nonlinear structural dynamics from the University of California at Berkeley, a dual M.B.A./M.Sc. as a Leaders for Global Operations Fellow and an interdisciplinary PhD in strategy, organizational behavior and system architecting from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Engineering Systems Division. He was as a researcher with MIT’s Lean Advancement Initiative and Communications Futures Program and is currently a postdoctoral research associate at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, where his research focuses on inter-organizational architectures, inter-species competition and the evolution of business ecosystems.